For many centuries, lace has been prized for its exquisite beauty and fineness. Its popularity and value sparked interest in alternatives to true lace that still retain its airy appeal. In the May/June 2010 issue of PieceWork, Mary Polityka Bush introduced us to the charms of Dresden lace embroidery. Here’s Mary with more on this […]

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No color makes a bigger statement than red. From shoes to lipstick, it’s a color that gets noticed. The March/April 2014 issue of PieceWork explores this eye-catching hue with articles such as “In Red They Trust: Slavic Belief in One Color’s Consummate Power” by Mary Polityka Bush. Enjoy this excerpt from Mary’s article: Embroidery, one […]

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In the May/June 2018 issue of PieceWork, our 11th-annual Lace Issue, Mary Polityka Bush tells us about the long tradition of Spanish women wearing a lace mantilla during Holy Week, the period of religious devotion between Palm Sunday and Easter. A woman’s lace mantilla is a very special piece of apparel. Here’s Mary to tell […]

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Named for a charming village located in the Tuscan countryside northwest of Florence, Italy, Casalguidi embroidery is a distinctive three-dimensional form of needlework, which is worked in neutral colors and mimics sculpted marble. In the September/October 2017 issue of PieceWork, contributor Mary Polityka Bush designed a spectacular box top that has all of the traditional […]

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3 Valentine’s Day Gifts to Make and Give

Make someone feel extra special with one of these great craft ideas from Mary Polityka Bush featured in PieceWork’s July/August 2005 issue. All you’ll need are a few materials to make Valentine’s Day gifts with vintage charm. 1. Crocheted Tote Bag To recycle a vintage crocheted table runner into a tote bag, I fold it […]

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Church Dolls: Seen but Not Heard

No equivalent of the modern-day Sunday school occupied children attending church with their families in the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Even the youngest children were expected to sit silently and respectfully alongside the grownups throughout one or more services that could last for hours. Because the children’s best behavior rarely lasted as long as […]

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The Great Depression (1929–1933) bankrupted countless people not only financially but emotionally as well. For many women, humble gingham fabric, inexpensive thread, and simple embroidery stitches combined to nourish and comfort tattered spirits. The embroidery technique that cheered them was known at the time as Depression Lace, Hoover Lace, or Hoover Star embroidery (the last […]

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