You’ve heard the claim regarding grafting knitting: “You can graft in any pattern by following just four easy steps!” But have you ever noticed that the four steps often change, depending on the tutorial? This is a good indication that a so-called “universal” grafting formula is as mythical as the unicorn at the top of […]

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So far in our myth-busting series on grafting knitting, we’ve seen that grafting purl stitches is just as easy as grafting knit stitches, that you shouldn’t get a half-stitch jog when grafting ribbing top-to-bottom, and that grafting creates two independent pattern rows. In part two of our discussion about how grafting creates two pattern rows, […]

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I ended the first post of this series with an illustration of two pieces of k1, p1 ribbing that had been grafted together top-to-top. The illustration (below) shows a slight jog in the ribbing pattern where the two pieces were joined. The grafted row appears in gray and I’ve placed color-coded grafting steps on the […]

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In 2013 (continuing into 2014), I wrote a series of blog posts that focused on five of the most common misconceptions people had about grafting knitting. In the years since the series debuted, I’ve received a lot of great comments from readers saying that they found the information very helpful, so we decided to republish […]

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One of the things I love most about knitting is that there are so many choices when it comes to working even the most basic techniques. Take increases, for example. Knitting increases serve a very practical function: to shape the fabric by adding new stitches. But beyond this practical function there is also a decorative […]

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Knitting a Chemo Hat: Five Guidelines

Recently, I knit a chemo hat for someone very close to me. Four weeks earlier, as we talked about her son’s upcoming wedding and our respective plans for the holidays, knitting a chemo hat for her was just about the furthest thing from my mind. But life has a way of throwing things at you […]

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So far in our series on grafting lace edgings, we’ve covered how to create: • a picot selvedge • a slip stitch selvedge at the beginning of a row • twisted stitches • single and double yarnovers • single and double decreases The sixth edging in our series on grafting lace edgings is another garter-stitch-based […]

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