September 10, 1990 The Ellis Island Immigration Station reopens after extensive restoration and becomes the Ellis Island Immigration Museum. The number of immigrants coming through Ellis Island declined severely following the passage of the Immigration Act of 1924. By 1949, the U.S. Coast Guard occupied most of the island. In November 1954, Ellis Island was […]

Read More >

The seventh edition of PieceWork’s Knitting Traditions, Fall 2013, is all about lace—its magic and mystery and its ethereal quality—as expressed in knitting. The word “lace” comes from the Latin verb laqueare, “to ensnare.” Many believe that lace originated with efforts to reproduce the web made by nature’s consummate lacemaker, the spider. The openwork fabric […]

Read More >

A Journey into Fine Work: PieceWork Fall 2018

Embark with us on a PieceWork journey that celebrates “fine work.” We travel the globe and present examples of especially fine embroidery, knitting, needlepoint, and crochet. In trying to describe the textiles shown in this issue, the words “intricate” and “exquisite” seem, at best, inadequate. Your journey begins with the example shown here, which was […]

Read More >

August 6, 1774 Mother Ann Lee, the leader of the United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing, or Shakers, and some of her followers arrive in New York from England. Here’s the needlework connection to this date: Seeking freedom of religion, Ann Lee, left England to establish the United Society of Believers in Christ’s […]

Read More >

July 19, 1848 The Seneca Falls Convention in Seneca Falls, New York, begins with notable suffragettes in attendance. Here’s the needlework connection to this date: Among the items for sale at the National Suffrage Bazar at New York City’s Madison Square Garden in December 1900 were, according to the December 15, 1900, issue of The […]

Read More >

May 22, 1843 About 1,000 people, 1,000 head of cattle, oxen, horses, and wagons left Independence, Missouri, for Oregon. The trek, about 2,000 miles (3,219 km), took five months. Here’s the needlework connection to this date: The Oregon Trail, pioneers, and wagon trains—these words conjure up romantic images. The reality, however, was far from romantic—it […]

Read More >

April 18, 1916: France bestows its highest honor—Chevalier of the Legion of Honour—on Edith Wharton for her remarkable war-relief efforts in Paris during World War I (1914–1918). Here’s the needlework connection to this date: Edith Wharton (1862–1937), one of America’s greatest author’s, was also a humanitarian and a knitter. References to knitting are sprinkled throughout […]

Read More >

December 16, 1775: Beloved author Jane Austen is born. Jane Austen and her work, both literary and needle, continue to fascinate. She has a substantial fan base here at Interweave: Interweave published six special issues, Jane Austen Knits, and several articles about her grace the pages of previous issues of PieceWork. They include “Whodunit? Ask […]

Read More >

This Week in History: Knit a Monmouth Cap

On October 25, 1415: England’s Henry V (1387–1422) defeats the French at the Battle of Agincourt, an epic battle during the Hundred Years’ War between the two countries. Frequent PieceWork contributor Christopher John Brooke Phillips explores the history of the knitted Monmouth cap in his article, “The Monmouth Cap,” in PieceWork’s special issue Knitting Traditions […]

Read More >

The Smithsonian Institution is Created

August 10, 1846 The Smithsonian Institution is Created One of the world’s greatest repositories of treasures was given to the United States by a little-known English scientist James Lewis Macie. Born circa 1765, he was the illegitimate son of Hugh Smithson, who later would become England’s first Duke of Northumberland. Macie’s mother was Elizabeth Keate […]

Read More >