In 2016, Knitting Ganseys Revised and Updated author Beth Brown-Reinsel attended an event in Cordova, Alaska, called FisherFolk. It honored past and present fisherfolk and fish and the knitting and knitters that clothed those involved in the fishing industry. Dotty Widmann, owner of a remarkable local craft store called The Net Loft, organized this event and […]

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Knitting Ganseys Revised and Updated author Beth Brown-Reinsel was inspired by the crisp stitch definition of Quince & Co.’s Osprey yarn when she designed this gansey dress featuring only knits and purls. Having a love of gored skirts, she designed the Aloutte Gansey dress with a flared skirt that narrows slowly within the panels. Both […]

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Although ganseys historically have been pullovers, cardigans are eminently practical for modern wear. Author Beth Brown-Reinsel designed this garment for the first edition of Knitting Ganseys more than 25 years ago to create a sweater that was beautifully patterned without the use of cables. For the new edition of Knitting Ganseys Revised & Updated Beth has […]

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This gansey is Knitting Ganseys Revised and Updated author Beth Brown-Reinsel’s interpretation of a Scottish Eriskay gansey from Rae Compton’s book The Complete Book of Traditional Guernsey and Jersey Knitting. The name Eirisgeidh, or Eriskay, is derived from the Norse for “Eric’s Isle.” Eriskay is one of many islands located in the Outer Hebrides. Many place-names […]

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Beth Brow-Reinsel’s deep love for Scottish ganseys is clear in the The Scottish Flags Hat from Gansey Style Accessories. And you too will fall in love with this simple pattern you can make for the whole family. Commonly seen on ganseys around Scotland, the knit-purl patterning on the Scottish Flags Hat pays tribute to this […]

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Gansey Style Accessories: Mallaig Socks

Mallaig is a fishing town in the western Highlands of Scotland on Loch Hourn. The small town grew with increased fishing in the 1800s, and the herring girls came to pack the fish there. However, by 1901, Mallaig’s economy was impacted by the railway (the “fish train”) causing fishing to decline. The motifs adorning the […]

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Hand garments are not the usual item considered in gansey knitting, but why not? Beth Brown-Riensel took on the challenge to fit a traditional gansey pattern onto the Inverness Gloves in Gansey Style Accessories. While the city of Inverness, located in the heart of the Scottish Highlands, is credited as the origin of the motif […]

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From the pages of Beth Brown-Reinsel’s Knitting Ganseys Revised and Updated, this heavy worsted-weight drop-shouldered gansey is a loose interpretation of the Scottish Eriskay ganseys. It has a looser fit and is made of vertical patterns in the lower body topped with a horizontal panel of pattern, with another motif on top. The classic gansey […]

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Gansey Style Accessories: Filey Scarf

When Beth Brown-Reinsel set out to design a simple gansey-inspired scarf for Gansey Style Accessories she realized what a difficult task this actually was. An easy scarf is actually quite a challenge to design: you want it to be interesting and to lie flat, while knitted fabrics have a tendency to roll and expose the […]

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Fingerless mitts are fun to wear and give just enough warmth on a chilly day, and the finely knit Sheringham Mitts from Beth Brown Reinsel’s Gansey Style Accessories are perfect for just that! These elegant mitts are knitted using a light fingering yarn, which affords more detail. The pattern adorning the cuff comes from the northeast […]

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