Plying

Congratulations! You’ve mastered spinning a singles yarn, and now it is time to ply it. The concept is simple enough; just take two (or three, or four, or more) singles, hold them together, and ply them by twisting them in the opposite direction they were originally spun. Simple, but the possibilities are endless—how much twist do you insert? How many plies do you include? What about novelty yarns? What if you’re using different fibers or colors in each ply? This is why plying is an art: you get to choose the composition of your yarn and each of these decisions, whether made consciously or unconsciously, will determine the outcome of your yarn and eventually the outcome of your finished piece. —excerpt from How to Ply Yarn by Amy Clarke Moore

We have gathered together a wide range of resources on plying yarn for you here. You will find lots of helpful tips, tricks, and hacks for all of your spinning needs! While you’re here, download our free ebook on plying and then check out the awesome spinning resources at Interweave.com!

Is spinning right ever wrong? Most millspun and handspun yarns I encounter are spun right (Z) and plied left (S). While this is the most common, there are some interesting reasons to reverse directions. Two-end knitting, also called twined knitting or tvåändsstickning, typically calls for Z-plied yarns and makes a great project for the knitter […]

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Tales of a Beginning Spinner: Learning to Ply

After I spun two bobbins of colored yarn, it was time to tackle plying. Right away, the whole spinning apparatus expanded. I needed not only to understand the wheel itself, but also to become familiar with the lazy kate that held bobbins of singles. Elizabeth set up the lazy kate as we began our lesson, […]

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Yarn Profile: Navajo Ply

What is a Navajo-ply yarn? A Navajo ply (or chain ply) is a 3-ply yarn spun from one singles. If the singles was Z-spun, then you will Navajo ply S, and if the singles was S-spun, then you will Navajo ply Z. The plying is done by creating a loop and drawing through a new […]

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You’ve mastered spinning a singles yarn and now it is time to ply yarn. The concept is simple enough—just take two (or three, or four, or more) singles, hold them together, and ply them by twisting them in the opposite direction they were originally spun. Simple, but the possibilities are endless—how do you keep them […]

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To make a plied yarn, spin two or more singles together with a reverse twist. If you spun the singles to the right (Z-twist), then you’ll need to spin your plied yarn to the left (S-twist). We use the word “singles” to refer to a yarn with a single twist; a plied yarn is yarn […]

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Your Go-To Plying Guide

I experienced the fun this summer of showing my 7-year-old grandson how my spinning wheel works. The machine sits in our living room and is a huge kid-magnet, invariably ending up with tangled drive band and jammed flyer. But this kid really wanted to know. So I let him work the treadle while I managed […]

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Three Tips for Plying Yarn

After I became a spinner, I developed a definite bias toward plied yarns. It’s true that when we stop at singles we make yarn that’s very difficult for a machine to replicate, but plied yarns are just better. Here are three reasons why–and three ways to do it better–from this little video I made called […]

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