The book Baby Wore White: Robes for Special Occasions, 1800–1910 by Heather Toomer is an outstanding volume that those interested in nineteenth-century clothing—both baby and adult—pattern making, and whitework will savor. In addition to clear, crisp photographs of more than seventy robes for babies, there are patterns from several surviving examples, historical and family details, […]

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The Knitting War Spies of History

In the United States and abroad, wartime has long involved knitters. Especially before women were involved in combat, they were encouraged to support troops from home by knitting necessary items for soldiers such as socks and hats. Since knitting was a very common sight, nobody would think of knitting as a suspicious activity. But knitting […]

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The Very Best Afghans in the World

Using little looms are all the rage these days. Yet, these portable and versatile tools have been around for quite some time. In the March/April 2010 issue of PieceWork, Robin Hansen recounts the story of her great-grandmother and the woven afghans she created on the handheld Weave-It loom. Here’s an excerpt from Robin’s article. The […]

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Those weird Victorians weren’t so weird really. They too adored the sensuous next-to-the-skin feel of silk. In Weldon’s Practical Needlework, there are several projects lacking illustrations, but we all know how lovely silk feels. Imagine how the knitted Gentlemen’s Silk Wristers, or Pulse Warmers from Volume 1 must feel. Divine! Yet, how do they look? […]

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Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House

The July/August 2017 issue of PieceWork features a story on Charlotte Brontë and the Sidgwick dollhouse, housed in the collection of the Leeds Museums and Art Galleries. It’s amazing how the change in scale of a dolls’ house leads to a vastly different perspective when looking at everyday objects. Another magnificent dolls’ house also resides […]

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July 18, 1867: Margaret (“Maggie”) Brown, known as “The Unsinkable Molly Brown,” is born Here’s the needlework connection: Among the images selected to illustrate Kax Wilson’s engrossing article, “Irish Crochet: When Famine Ravaged in Ireland,” in the March/April 1993 issue of PieceWork is a photograph of “Molly Brown.” The caption reads: “Molly Brown, the ‘unsinkable’ […]

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The Art of Embroidery: Inspirational Stitches, Textures and Surfaces by Françoise Tellier-Loumagne will inspire needleworkers to think outside the box. Hundreds of stunning textural photographs offer a dreamlike look at nature’s beauty. Although the book does not instruct on embroidery techniques, it invites the reader to explore, express, and execute embroidery without restraint. The concepts […]

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Les Tricoteuses: A Bastille Day Yarn

On July 14, France celebrates Bastille Day (or as they call it “Quatorze Juillet”), the anniversary of the storming of the Bastille prison in 1789 that marked a turning point in the French Revolution—well, the first of their revolutions, anyway. Joseph Marie Jacquard was still a decade away from developing his famous punchcard-driven loom, though […]

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Latvia’s Favorite Knitter: Jette Užāne

During the 1980s, the knitting world’s fascination with stranded-colorwork mittens of Latvia was spurred by books such as Lizbeth Upitis’s Latvian Mittens: Traditional Designs & Techniques. In PieceWork’s January/February 2010 issue, Barbara Plakans recounts the story of one of Latvia’s most revered mitten knitters, Jette Užāne. Jette Užāne [1924–2007] rarely left Lejnieki (Place down in […]

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Weldon’s Mystery Project: Knitted Collar

Have you been knitting along with our Weldon’s mystery project series? Last week, we offered the pattern for Knitted Lace or Edging. Did you cast on? This week we offer another pattern sans illustration from Weldon’s Practical Needlework, Volume 1. What does the Knitted Collar look like? We’re eager to find out? Join us and […]

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