Weave Two Gorgeous Ombre Infinity Scarves

Ombré’s versatility has made it trendy for more than a decade and a half. It’s constantly open to new interpretations and a fresh perspective, because it’s such a simple concept: shifting smoothly from color to color and/or from dark to light.

Weaving an ombré scarf is not only fun—it allows you to create a classic, timeless piece you’ll love to wear for years to come.

From designer Trudy Sonia, here’s a weaving kit to make a pair of gorgeous ombré infinity scarves that shift seamlessly from color to color. Both scarves are woven in 8-shaft point twill on a black warp, but each scarf uses a different tie-up to create unique patterning. One of the scarves transitions from mineral green to silvery birch and back, while the other fades from coral to dark taupe.

Here’s what Trudy had to say about her inspiration for these scarves, with a little more information about the technique she used to transition from one color to another:

8-shaft weaving patterns for two ombre infinity scarves!

Top: Mineral Green colorway fading to Birch. Bottom: Taupe fades to Deep Sea Coral. Each 8-shaft scarf uses a different tie-up for variety in your weaving, but you only need to warp once.

“Derived from umbra, the Latin word for shadow, ombré is a French term for a dye process that transitions colors smoothly from dark to light. In 18th-century France, ombré was popular in ribbons and dress goods shaded with different colors or various shades of the same color. Since then, it has been used to adorn pre-Civil War quilts, furniture, and textiles, and has recently become popular for everything from clothing to hair color to fingernails.

I first came across ombré as a way of transitioning between weft colors in Margo Selby’s Color and Texture in Weaving. According to Selby, the ombré effect is the gradual introduction of a new color. “In each repeat of the lifting plan, the number of picks of a new color is increased until the color becomes solid.”

This handwoven infinity scarf is a wonderful 8 shaft weaving project for experienced beginners and beyond.

You can see how the scarf forms two different-colored loops with a subtle transition.

I enjoy the process of gradually transitioning from one color to another, and I’ve used the technique to create upholstery fabric as well as dozens of scarves. The color transition is gradual, with very little stripe effect, and, depending on the weave structure, the change can occur over several inches or within a much smaller space.

The scarves have only two color transitions, one at the center of the scarf and the second near the seam. The rest of the scarf is woven with a single shuttle in one of the two colors. This creates an infinity scarf with each “loop” of the scarf a different color, and the transition between the two colors is very gradual.”

Put this gorgeous yarn to work with two 8 shaft weaving patterns for a pair of gorgeous handwoven infinity scarves.

The Ombré Infinity Scarves Kit, with 5 colors of gorgeous Tencel yarn.

The materials to weave both scarves are included in the Ombré Infinity Scarves Kit, along with Trudy Sonia’s instructions on how to weave an infinity scarf from the March/April 2016 issue of Handwoven. Both scarves are woven in 8/2 Tencel, giving the scarves a beautiful sheen and drape without sacrificing washability.

If I had an eight-shaft loom, this would be my fall weaving project! If you are fortunate enough to have eight shafts at your disposal, get the kit today and weave one scarf up for you and the other for a friend. Or, keep both for yourself—I won’t tell.

Happy Weaving!

Andrea-Signature

P.S. What other ideas do you have for weaving ombré? Share in the comments!

One Comment

  1. Ann A at 2:15 pm April 9, 2017

    I have woven the ombre scarves. I am having problems with the direction for assembly. Should I sew one end of one scarf to one end of the other scarf wrong sides together? Press. Them turn so right sides are together and stitch again? The seam would then be on the outside.
    Ann Ashworth nashworth2@comcast.net

Post a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.