Do you spin pet fur? Show us what you’ve got!

People spin pet fur for different reasons. (On purpose, even.)

Some spinners look at the drifts of soft fur left by a beloved dog or cat and think, “I could make something with that.” Some think it would be an excellent party trick. Some want to remember a beloved, departed pet. Some people are really . . . thrifty. (We won’t judge. Really.)

Spin Off opens calls for submissions about four times a year, and sometimes themes arise spontaneously. In the last few months, we’ve received several proposals dealing with spinning dog hair, cat hair, knitted dog hair projects, you name it.

I give in. Spin Off is going to the dogs. And cats.

My own feline companions, being shorthaired, are not good candidates for spinning projects. But try telling them that!

My own feline companions, being shorthaired, are not good candidates for spinning projects. But try telling them that!

In the Winter 2018 issue, Spin Off focuses on Warmth, and we invite you to share your creations from Spot or Fluffy. We’ll photograph a gallery of projects in our studio. Here’s how to have your work considered:

1. Send us the finished product (and a small skein and/or fiber sample, if you have it) to us no later than July 15, 2017. (Email us for shipping details before sending so we can receive and track your project carefully.) We will need to retain the items for photography until at least late August. Items must be clean, dry, and fragrance-free.

2. Email us a high-resolution, photo of the fiber-bearing pet (preferably with the spinner included) and 30-70 words about the pet, the spinning, the project, or whatever you feel makes the item special. Include your name and contact information so we can match it with your project.

3. If we are able to use your work, we will contact you with a photo release and other details.

The only thing better would be a studio full of kitties and puppies!

For the Lovecats Cowl Kit, editor Deb Gerish brought her very brave kitty to the photo studio. She didn’t make the final cut, but she was ready for her close-up. Photo by George Boe.

For the Lovecats Cowl Kit, editor Deb Gerish brought her very brave kitty to the photo studio. She didn’t make the final cut, but she was ready for her close-up. Photo by George Boe.

—Anne

Feature Image: Photo by Auscape/UIG via Getty Images

4 Comments

  1. Lisa R at 6:12 am April 26, 2017

    I started out spinning dog hair 50 years ago. It is nothing new. And, you are spinning hair not fur.
    I have spun hair from over 40 breeds of dogs, as well as other domesticated animals. Both have been either shed annually or shorn.

    Best wishes,

  2. Kris W at 8:00 am April 26, 2017

    I once spun 38 ounces of Chow dog hair in exchange for a free weekend at a bed and breakfast in Newport, RI. The owners had saved garbage bags FULL of 20 years of owning that kind of dog. I did NOT spin all of it. It was quite lovely yarn and the owners were happy with it. My husband and I had a nice weekend so I think it was a good exchange.

  3. Alix D at 9:33 am April 26, 2017

    I belonged to a Samoyed club almost 50 years ago. An elderly couple wore the most delightful sweaters knitted from Sammy wool. I mentioned that I would love a sweater like that and Mr. B. informed me gruffly that I would have to spin and knit it myself. When I whined and said I didn’t have a wheel, he built me my first spinning wheel and he and his wife taught me how to spin. Dog hair is not the easiest fibre with which to learn spinning but once you have mastered that, the fibre world has nothing you cannot spin!! I have a little business called Hair of the Dog Spinning and my biggest commission was 60 ounces of Samoyed hair and my worst was some really short (1/2″ long) Bichon Frise. Due to the fact that chiengora is 80% warmer than wool, I do occasionally blend it with wool (which also gives it some memory) but for small items – toques, scarves, mitts etc -I like to spin the fibre 100% .

  4. Charles S at 10:39 am April 27, 2017

    I have spun various breeds of dog and cat hair. Samoyed is my favorite dog hair to spin. Friends of mine give me ziplock bags of their Pomeranian brushings which I blend with wool. And occasionally I am gifted with brushings from a long-haired cat which I then blend with wool. Dog hair gives a nice halo to scarves and caps. My projects that contain cat hair are very subject to felting, so I only give the finished product a gentle wash.

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