Check Sock Knitting Off Your Resolution List in No Time with the Cuff to Cuff Socks

Sock knitting has never been something I’ve envisioned myself doing. But, hey, it’s 2019, and, as they say, “New year, new me,” right? In the spirit of the season, I’m taking a crack at my first resolution—to get out of my knitting comfort zone—with my first WIP of the year, the Cuff to Cuff Socks from 100 Knits.

Just look how happy that kid looks in his socks. Also if you’re wondering, yes, that is the kid from Fuller House. © F+W Media, Inc. by Joe Hancock

Just look how happy that kid looks in his socks. Also if you’re wondering, yes, that is the kid from Fuller House. © F+W Media, Inc. by Joe Hancock

I must confess: When I first started looking for patterns to tackle my sock-knitting resolution, I thought this endeavor might be over quicker than it started. My fickle and fleeting attention span confines my knitting, so, realistically, I wasn’t sure whether I’d manage to sit through knitting two identical things.

Call it pure serendipity, but it was around this time that I happened to read a blog post that designer Courtney Spainhower wrote about her Cuff to Cuff Socks. Although I encourage you to read Courtney’s story about this unique design, I’ll briefly summarize things here.

The Cuff to Cuff Socks are a solution to a problem I didn’t even know I had: “second-sock syndrome.” Call it a lack of interest or just a plain dislike for sock knitting, but this block is what keeps many knitters, including me, from knitting socks. Unlike a lot of other two-at-a-time sock patterns, The Cuff to Cuff Socks are extremely customizable and aren’t just a long tube with a lot of afterthought editing.

Can’t tell what’s more awesome: finally starting my Cuff to Cuff Socks, or getting to knit them with this view in the background.

Can’t tell what’s more awesome: finally starting my Cuff to Cuff Socks, or getting to knit them with this view in the background.

Even though I’ve only just begun to knit the Cuff to Cuff socks, I’m already completely and utterly captivated by them. I have no doubt that I’ll be able to follow through with my sock-knitting resolution.

© F+W Media, Inc. by Joe Hancock

© F+W Media, Inc. by Joe Hancock

Pattern Details

FINISHED SIZE
Circumference: About 5¾ (6½, 7, 8)”.
Foot length: About 5¾ (7, 7, 7¾)”.
To fit: 5–8y (7–10y, Women’s U.S. sizes 6–9, Women’s U.S. sizes 8–11).
Socks shown from book measure 5¾” and 8″, and I’m following Courtney’s easy instructions to modify the pattern to a men’s U.S. sizes 10½–12 sized sock.

YARN
DK weight (#3 light).
Shown in book: Tanis Fiber Arts Yellow Label DK (100% superwash Merino wool; 260 yd [238 m]/115 g): sprout, 1 (1, 1, 2) hanks.
Shown in my WIP: Wool and the Gang Sugar Baby Alpaca (100% alpaca; 127 yd [116 m]/50 g): curasao blue.

NEEDLES
(affiliate link) Size U.S. 6 (4 mm): 2 16″ circular (cir) and set of 2 double-pointed (dpn).
Or if you want to follow my suit use magic loop:
(affiliate link) Size U.S. 6 (4 mm): 32″ or longer cir.
Adjust needle size if necessary to achieve the correct gauge.

NOTIONS
Markers, waster yarn, tapestry needle.

GAUGE
25 sts and 34 rnds = 4″ in St st worked in rnds.

Happy sock knitting!

Hayley

(Featured Image: © F+W Media, Inc. by Joe Hancock)


Ready to tackle your sock knitting resolution too? Check out the Cuff to Socks and other designs from Courtney below!

 

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