I’m Not Quitting My Brioche Knitting

I have the brioche knitting bug. Ever since I started exploring a few of the many brioche stitch variations, I haven’t been able to stop knitting brioche.

The basic elements of brioche stitch—a slipped stitch and a yarnover worked together on the next row—are always the same, but if you work them slightly differently you get a range of surprisingly—sometimes shockingly—different fabrics. I wanted to give you a few more examples of brioche knitting in action.

A few notes:

• When knitting brioche, begin with a tubular cast-on. Brioche is super stretchy and needs some room.

• The examples below have an even number of stitches unless otherwise stated.

• A standard bind-off is fine if you are careful to work loosely. If you want to get fancy, use a tubular bind-off.

Basic Brioche. Take a look at basic brioche stitch. It’s fully reversible, and once you have it down, you can crank out yards of the stuff on full auto-pilot. Great for subway commutes, hospitals, or any place where you could use a little mindful distraction.

• Using the tubular method, CO an even number of stitches.
• Set-up Row: K1, *k1, sl1yo; rep from * to last stitch, k1.
• Pattern Row: K1, *brk1 (knit the slipped stitch and yarn over together as one stitch), sl1yo; rep to last stitch, k1.
• Rep Pattern row for brioche rib.

Half Brioche Stitch

Half Brioche. This hybrid of brioche and stockinette is very hard to tell from basic brioche at first glance. Look closely, though, and you’ll see it’s actually brioche rib on one side and purl rib on the other. If anything, the fabric is even plusher than brioche, and that’s saying something. Though Row 2 is technically the RS, half brioche produces a reversible fabric with no curl whatsoever. Try it as a fold-over collar or as the edges of an open-front cardi; it’s a subtle, sophisticated touch.

• Using the tubular method, CO an even number of stitches.
• Row 1: K1, *k1, sl1yo; rep from * to last stitch, k1.
• Row 2: K1, *brk1 (work the YO and slipped stitch together as k2tog), p1; rep to last stitch, k1.
• Rep Rows 1-2 for pattern.

Twist Brioche. I lied. You don’t always work the slipped stitch and yarnover together. Sometimes you work them separately, as in this twist stitch version of brioche. Working the yarnovers separately can create a rather lacy effect, especially if you use larger-than-normal needles. The twist row is worked on alternate sides, so the pattern is fully reversible.

Yes, it looks wonky at first. Once knit, you want to really block this baby.

• Using the tubular method, CO an odd number of stitches.
• Row 1: K1, *K2tog, sl1yo; rep from * to last stitch, K1.
• Row 2: K1, *brk1 (work the YO and slipped stitch together as k2tog), sl1yo; rep to last stitch, k1.
• Row 3: K1, *brioche twist (knit the YO of the brk and leave it on the left needle; work the knit stitch of the brk; slide both stitches off the left needle), k1; rep from * to last stitch, k1.
• Rep rows 1-3 for pattern.

Are there other versions of brioche you like? Let us know!
Allison


More resources on brioche knitting in the store!

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