Knit a Mosaic!

When we traveled to Egypt a couple of years ago, I was so impressed with the fabulous mosaics we got to see. These amazing works of art were huge, many over 20 feet tall, and I marveled at the fact that these gigantic masterpieces were made up of 1/2-inch and smaller bits of glass, stone, pottery, and so forth. Simply amazing.

Mosaic knitting is pretty amazing, too.

Ann McDonald Kelly designed a beautiful mosaic scarf, Tessellating Leaves. Here’s what she has to say about this pattern: “This interlocking leaf design came about when I was doodling on graph paper. The mosaic technique forces you to take a design element down to its basic structure. The result is an organic shape that is very graphic and modern. If you’ve worked stripes in two colors you can work mosaic knitting. Mosaic patterns are created by slipping stitches from the row below without working them.”

mosaic

Ann McDonald Kelly designed a beautiful mosaic scarf, Tessellating Leaves

Mosaic knitting is a great technique for beginning color knitting. The slip-stitch pattern is easy to work, and it really packs a punch! Just look at the beautiful mosaic of leaves in that scarf! Fantastic.

Basically, the colors in this pattern alternate every two rows. Here’s how it works:

  • On main-color, right-side rows, you knit all of the main-color stitches and slip all of the contrasting-color stitches purlwise with yarn in back.
  • On the main-color, wrong-side rows, you purl all of the main-color stitches and slip all of the contrasting-color stitches purlwise with yarn in front.
  • On the  contrasting-color, right-side rows, you knit all of the contrasting-color stitches and slip all of the main-color stitches purlwise with yarn in back.
  • On the contrasting-color, wrong-side rows, you purl all of the contrasting-color stitches and slip all of the main-color stitches purlwise with yarn in front.

The key is to place the yarn correctly as you slip the stitches so that it doesn’t show on the right side of the work. In this pattern, you don’t cut the yarn when the color changes; you carry the unused color up the side of the work and bring the new color up under color you just used. This technique makes for far fewer ends to weave in!

There’s a note in the pattern that the sample scarf used almost all of four skeins of yarn, so be mindful of that—don’t leave too long of a tail on your cast-on!

This really is a statement scarf. It’s large—about 16″ wide by 67″ long, plus about eight inches of fringe. The pattern is such a knockout; the statement you’ll make is, “I am a great knitter, and don’t you wish you were, too?”

You’ll love knitting and wearing this scarf, so get your kit and start knitting!

Cheers,
Kathleen

Featured Image: Neon Mosaic Scarf by Ann McDonald Kelly from knitscene Winter 2014.


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