Interweave Crochet Fall 2008 Galleries, Part Two

Interweave Crochet Fall 08Take several beautiful crocheted garments. Add the cast and crew of one magical local yarn shop. Flavor with a fun and stylish Interweave Crochet magazine editor, a wacky Knitting Daily editor and a fun-loving mannequin named Bertha. What do you have? A recipe for the first-ever LYS Knitting Daily Gallery!

Here are the second set of Galleries (see the link below for the first set!).

Spanish Moss Coat by Tracy St. John

Ridge Swing Cardigan by Robyn Chachula

Northern Dreams by Julia Vaconsin

Diamond Cabled Pullover by Drew Emborsky

View the first set of Interweave Crochet Galleries

Thanks to all our gorgeous local yarn shop models: Kathryn, Jeanette, Joanne, Chelsea, Cherie, Erin, Crystal, Barbara, Lucy, Eleanor, Pam, and Grayce. You folks made our garments glow!


Spanish Moss Coat by Tracy St. John

This was a crowd favorite! Warm, light, pretty… Everyone wanted one for themselves. Note that if you are not partial to mohair, you could make a lovely version out of linen, or a silk/wool blend. Whatever yarn you are contemplating, be sure to make a long, very generous swatch, and hang it vertically on your wall for a while after blocking. Why? The length of this coat means that anything other than an ultralight fiber has the potential to stretch out lengthwise, and you'll want to know how much the fabric stretches BEFORE you crochet the entire coat!

 
Jeanette: I practically ordered Jeanette to make one of these for herself. In red. With big silver buttons. The length is great on her tall frame, and the buttons and collar are a perfect frame for her terrific smile!   Kim: One word: Adorable. Is the coat too big, or just right? That's up to Kim, and how she wants to wear it! Just points to notice and think about here: The fit across the top of her shoulders is good, as is the fit across the bust, but notice the sides, underarms, and sleeves–very loose. The drop shoulders emphasize the oversized look on her. She could make a size smaller, adding width to the fronts if needed. She could also drop that second button down by a couple inches, so that it falls below the fullest part of her bust, not directly at it. A button at the fullest part of the bust, well. It tends to make us women look as though we have three, instead of two, assets up front.
 
Kathryn: Notice that the buttons are pulling just a bit; the shoulders are also just a bit too tight for a coat. Kathryn would be more comfortable in a larger size, which would add more drape all around. Plus, who wants a coat that won't close all the way down the front? Brrr. (Gorgeous color on her, however. Rock the greens, Kathryn.)   Me: I need a bigger size–but shorter sleeves and a shorter hem, to match my shorter self! For those of us who can't reach the second shelf in the kitchen without a step stool, long coats need to fall above the knee so that we don't look like we are playing dress-up. This is especially true of A-line garments such as this one, where the garment's hem is significantly wider than the bust area–all that extra width down at the bottom makes you see only Coat and not Sandi.
  Bertha needs a smaller size. She looks as though she is wearing her momma's coat! And she also needs smaller buttons–the buttons are out of proportion to her delicate frame. (If all you can look at is the buttons, and if they keep pulling your eyes back to themselves, then they are the wrong buttons.)

Ridge Swing Cardigan by Robyn Chachula

"Worked on the bias"–what on earth does that mean, you ask. It means that each panel is worked diagonally, starting from one corner, increasing stitches at both ends of the row to form a triangle shape. Once the bottom of the triangle (one of the short sides) is the proper width, then you work a rectangle, still on the diagonal, by increasing at one end of the row and decreasing at the other end of the row, thus preserving the stitch count to form the rectangle. Ingenious! This also gives you a bit of room to do some custom shaping–you can add more increase rows to the beginning "triangle" to widen the whole panel, or work fewer increase rows to narrow it. So for instance: Say the back is the perfect width for you, but the front panels are not wide enough. Work the front panels with more increase rows before you work the rectangle section. Want a longer cardigan? Work more "work even" rows in the rectangle section. Want a shorter cardi? Then work fewer rows in the rectangle section. Use your gauge swatch, the schematic, and a favorite sweater to concoct a cardi that will be a favorite for years to come.

 
Pam: In the right size, this cardigan will be a knockout on Pam–the texture sets off her lovely skin, the brown compliments her hair…nice. But the fronts are not wide enough, and the sleeves are too long. What to do? Pam needs to first decide if the back fits her, as that will tell her if she needs to go up a size or not. (The fronts are too small, either way; so she needs a starting point.) The back was a bit too small on her, pulling across the shoulders–so at least one, if not two, size(s) up would be a good call. Then Pam would get out a cardigan from her closet that fit her across the front the way she likes things to fit; she would compare that measurement with the one on the schematic, and add increase rows to the initial triangle accordingly. The sleeves need to be shorter here so you can see her hands (long sleeves that cover the hands tend to pull the eye down to hip level, not a happy thing for many of us!).

Kim: It looks as though this sweater is too big on Kim–but is it really? What makes it look too big? For one thing, the sleeves are too long; they need to be shorter. For another thing: Notice where the shoulder seam falls–it falls a few inches down her shoulder, so that it looks like a drop-sleeve (which it is not). That makes it look too big, even though the sweater obviously will not close over hips and bust. So we have three zones of fit to pay attention to in the body of the sweater: hips, bust, and shoulders. Kim needs more room in the hips, a bit more room at the bust, and less room in the shoulders! So the challenge here would be to do two things: work more increases in the initial triangle to get the front panel wide enough for hips and bust, and work enough decreases in the shoulder/armhole shaping to have the sleeve seam sit correctly on her narrow shoulders. The first thing I would advise, and I know this sounds crazy, but here it is: start with a larger size, so that the back fits properly as well. Why? Well, you can't tell from this photo, but I noticed that the side seam on Kim pulled well back from her own "side seam"! You want your side seam to fall at your side, not an inch or so back from the midline under your arm. (Measure, compare to schematic…do I sound like a robot yet?) Then adjust the front panels as needed.

 

Now it's your turn.

There are two more Galleries without commentaries–Northern Dreams Pullover and Diamond Cables Pullover. Why no Sandi Commentaries on the last two? Because now I want YOU to be the commentators. Check out the photos, look at the fit of the sweaters in the ten areas listed above, and write in your own commentaries about the best fit and flatter for our models.

 

Northern Dreams by Julia Vaconsin

 
Chelsea   Grayce
     
Bertha    

Diamond Cabled Pullover by Drew Emborsky

   
 
Sandi   Bertha

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