The Santa Fe Turquoise Trail Scarf: A Finished Object I Love Too Much

Friends, I’m in a dilemma. It’s a dilemma that is literally keeping me up at night, filling me with doubt, and making me wonder if, deep down, I’m truly a terrible person. My problem? I have a finished object meant as a gift . . . and I don’t want to part with it. As soon as I finished my Santa Fe Turquoise Trail Scarf, I knew I was in trouble.

I infused a lot of love into this scarf, carefully following lace charts, learning a new grafting technique, and stitching countless repeats. Despite the hard work, I really loved working this pattern, with its satisfying geometric shapes, neat zig-zag edging, and clever short rows.

santa fe turquoise trail scarf

Mara Bishop Statnekov added elements of the rich textile designs of the American Southwest to traditional Orenburg lace techniques and motifs to produce a gorgeous geometric design.

The problem is, I seem to have poured a little too much love into this scarf. I love it a lot and I want to keep it and cuddle it and stroke it and wear it every day.

This scarf was originally destined to be a gift, and not for just anyone. I intended this scarf to be a present for my mother, a woman who is so wonderful, kind, and caring that she still makes me and my roommates dinner once a week and lets me take leftovers home. Oh yeah, and she gave life to my very being, or whatever . . . that too.

When I’m planning to give a project as a gift, I sometimes like to work on it once or twice in front of the person it’s intended for, just to make sure they really seem to like it. When I brought out the half-finished Santa Fe Turquoise Trail Scarf in front of my mom, she of course exclaimed over the beautiful color, the gorgeous lace, and the overall awesome-ness that is Mara Bishop Statnekov’s design. So I can’t even pretend I don’t think she’d truly appreciate it.

santa fe turquoise trail scarf

Just look at that geometric lace! Who wouldn’t want to keep this scarf for their own? But who wouldn’t love to receive it as a gift? What to do, what to do?

I’m really in a pickle, here. On the one hand, I feel beholden unto the original destiny of the scarf. It knows it’s supposed to be hers, and so does the universe. Maybe if I selfishly keep it, something horrible will happen to it and serve me right.

But, on the other hand, I feel like if you love a piece of knitwear as much as I love this darn scarf, it’s irresponsible to give it away. Maybe the universe wants me to have it, and we’ll have all sorts of wonderful adventures together and it will make all of my outfits so much cooler.

I never want to take it off!

Please let me know in the comments: what the heck should I do? Has this ever happened to you? How did you handle the situation? I’m badly in need of help, here.

Yours in Stitches,
—Andrea


Buyer Beware: You Won’t Be Able to Give This Scarf Away!

3 Comments

  1. Rita F at 9:07 am November 17, 2017

    Give the gift. The joy you experience when you see your mom wearing it and loving it will never get old. If you keep it, you’ll never stop thinking about how you should have gave it away. It will taint the shawl. Besides, it sounds like she lives close. You can borrow it occasionally, no?

    Give the gift.

    PS: this is also the reason I don’t have hardly any hand knit stuff for myself. I end up accidentally giving stuff away. I made a pair of fox sox and brought them to my 93 year old aunt’s place to show her. I handed them to her and said, “what do you think” and she said ” I LOVE THEM. Thank you so much!”. And the joy I feel knowing my 93 year old aunt is wearing socks with little fox faces on them is FAR more awesome than wearing them myself. My mom was cold one day so I loaned her my “Close to You” shawl and she has not given it back to me. I still say give the gift.

  2. Christine D at 9:12 am November 17, 2017

    It is lovely. You Both should have such a lovely piece. Make another for yourself, perhaps in another color. Or, if it was primarily the color that has you smitten, make a scarf in another design with that gorgeous yarn.

    Third alternative, give it to your mother and borrow it occasionally.

    • Andrea Lotz at 10:06 am November 17, 2017

      Christine, now THAT is an idea I can get behind!

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