Your Favorite Fall Knitting Patterns from Interweave

“Want a copy of Interweave Knits?” asks assistant editor Sarah Rothberg, entering my office with a pile of magazines.

My response is immediate and intense.

Whatever I was working on before goes instantly on the back burner. My number one priority is now poring over every page, exclaiming over favorite patterns and styling choices, and mentally expanding my ever-growing knitting queue. And then looking through the issue again…and maybe one more time.

As Interweave’s yarn and fiber social media manager, I don’t typically see inside the issue until it lands on my desk. After that, we get very, very well acquainted. Part of my job is putting every issue Interweave releases on Ravelry, a job that would be on the tedious side if every issue and every project weren’t so dazzlingly beautiful.

I’m always curious to see if the projects I fall in love with at first sight are the same ones that rise to the top on Ravelry. I’m often surprised! In any case, it’s always interesting to find out what caught the eyes of my fellow knitters. In that spirit, here are the top three patterns from each of Interweave’ s fall knitting issues, according to Ravelry. I know a number of these patterns have already found their way into my queue—what about yours?


Interweave Knits, Fall 2017

fall knitting patterns

Angelina Pullover by Mary Anne Benedetto

The Angelina Pullover is perfect in its simplicity: style it with a woolen skirt, trousers, or jeans for a versatile fall look. The circular yoke features wishbone-shaped cables that increase in size to accommodate the yoke shaping. Plus, the curved hem and bell-like three-quarter sleeves make it ideal for layering.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Sizes: 47 (49.75, 53, 55.5, 58.75, 61.25)” hem circumference, bust circumference 36.5 (38.75, 41, 43.25, 45.5, 47.75).”

Recommended Yarn: The Fibre Co. Cumbria (60% merino wool, 30% Masham wool, 10% mohair): #85 Dodd Wood, 6 (6, 7, 7, 8, 8) skeins. Yarn distributed by Kelbourne Woolens.

Construction: This pullover is worked in the round from the top down. The lower front and back edges are shaped with short-rows. The sleeves are worked in the round from the top down.

Tangled Up In Gray Pullover by Sloane Rosenthal

The Tangled Up in Gray Pullover is the cozy cabled turtleneck you’ll reach for on cold mornings. Equally at home with jeans and boots or over a flowing dress, the design takes a classic knit aesthetic and modernizes it with an intriguing asymmetric motif and crisp tailoring. Just imagine cozying up in that chunky ribbed collar!

Difficulty: Intermediate

Sizes: 31.75 (36, 40.5, 43.25, 47.75)” bust circumference.

Recommended Yarn: Hudson Valley Fibers Hudson (50% alpaca, 50% Corriedale): storm king, 12 (13, 15, 16, 18) skeins.

Construction: This pullover is worked back and forth in separate pieces and seamed.

Nelson Pullover by Irina Anikeeva

The Nelson Pullover is a modern knitter’s take on men’s athletic wear…and it would look fabulous on women as well. This sporty, youthful pullover features a continuous cable that runs up the sleeve and shoulder into the cowl neck. The drawstring ties and collar add charm as well as warmth in cold weather.

Difficulty: Experienced

Finished Size: 36.5 (40, 44.5, 48, 52.5)” chest circumference.

Recommended Yarn: Brown Sheep Company Nature Spun Worsted (100% wool): 133W blue fog, 5 (6, 6, 7, 8) balls.

Construction: This pullover is worked from the top down. The saddle shoulders are worked back and forth, then stitches for the back and fronts are picked up along the edges of the saddles and worked back and forth to the underarm. The pieces are then joined and the lower body is worked in the round to the lower edge.


knitscene, Fall 2017

fall knitting patterns

White Smoke Cardigan by Alison Green

Equally at home in the office, out on a date, or over your PJs, the White Smoke Cardigan is the kind of classic wardrobe piece you’ll turn to again and again. And the sturdy construction ensures it will stand up to endless wear. The only decision left to make? Which of the fabulous muted colors of Berroco Cotolana will you choose?

Difficulty: Intermediate

Sizes: 16.5 (18.75, 20.5, 22.75, 24.5, 26.75, 28.5)” back width.

Recommended Yarn: Berroco Cotolana (47% wool, 47% cotton, 6% nylon): #3503 birch, 9 (10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16) balls.

Construction: This cardigan is worked back and forth from the top down. First the back is worked down to the underarm. The fronts begin with neck extensions that will be sewn to the back neck, then front shoulder stitches are picked up from the back shoulders and worked down to the underarm. The back and fronts are then joined and worked in one piece to the lower edge. The sleeves are picked up around the armhole and sleeve caps are worked using short-rows.

Chili Pepper Cardigan by Bonnie Sennott

Here’s a classic cardigan with a hint of spice! Lots of stockinette ensures you’ll work through the bulk of the cardigan at a rapid pace, while the fun lozenge stitch pattern on the collar, fronts, and sleeves will keep you interested. Did I mention it’s worked in one piece? Time to get stitching!

Difficulty: Intermediate

Sizes: 32 (36, 40, 44, 48, 52)” bust circumference with fronts meeting at center.

Recommended Yarn: Valley Yarns Northfield (70% merino, 20% baby alpaca, 10% silk): #03 chestnut, 9 (10, 11, 13, 14, 15) skeins. Yarn distributed by WEBS.

Construction: The body of this cardigan is worked back and forth in one piece from the lower edge to the underarm, then the upper fronts and back are worked separately. Stitches for the sleeves are picked up around the armhole and the sleeves are worked in the round from the top down with short-rows to shape the sleeve cap.

Blake Shawl by Laura Reinbach

One of the most versatile accessories you’ll ever knit, the Blake Shawl can be worn in traditional shawl fashion, around the neck as a scarf in a variety of ways, over your head to protect your hairstyle from the rain, around your waist…endless possibilities. The stitch pattern is easy to memorize, but varied enough to keep you addicted.

Difficulty: Easy

Size: 83” wide and 21” tall.

Recommended Yarn: Brown Sheep Company Nature Spun Fingering (100% wool): #148 autumn leaves, 4 balls.

Construction: The triangle shaping occurs with a yarnover increase at the beginning of right-side rows and an ssk decrease at the beginning and a yarnover increase at the end of wrong-side rows.


Love of Knitting, Fall 2017

fall knitting patterns

Guernsey Shawl by Mone Dräger

Traditional knitting motifs borrowed from the Isle of Guernsey run across this generously sized triangle shawl. Knitters in Guernsey decorated close-fitting fishermen’s sweaters (known as ganseys or jerseys) with similar knit and purl motifs. Imagine how warm this oversized shawl would be on a chilly fall or winter day…

Difficulty: Easy

Size: 80” wide and 33” tall.

Recommended Yarn: Brown Sheep Company Lamb’s Pride Superwash Worsted (100% wool): #SW60 sandy beach, 6 balls.

Construction: The shawl is worked back and forth in rows from the top down.

Ashwood Hoodie by Jenny Williams

Knitting with leaf motifs is a great way to bring the spirit of fall into your knitting. Ash leaves adorn the sleeves, fronts, and hood of this cardigan. Sew in a zipper for warmth on windy days. You’ll love the split hem, functional yet stylish hood, and the gorgeous tweed look of the yarn, guaranteed.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Sizes: 32 (36, 40, 44, 48, 52)” bust circumference.

Recommended Yarn: Knit Picks City Tweed DK (55% merino wool, 25% superfine alpaca, 20% Donegal tweed): #24539 desert sage, 11 (12, 13, 14, 15, 16) balls. Yarn distributed by Crafts Americana.

Construction: This cardigan is worked back and forth in separate pieces and seamed.

Nottingham Lace Cardigan by Rebecca Blair

A wide lace border adorns the bottom of this square-necked cardigan, creating a balanced look that flatters many body types. With this sweater, you can travel back to preindustrial times by knitting the lace border; during the Industrial Revolution, inexpensive machine-made lace from Nottingham adorned clothing and homes all across England.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Sizes: 31.5 (35.5, 39.5, 43.5, 47.5, 51.5)” bust circumference, buttoned.

Recommended Yarn: Valley Yarns Northfield (70% merino wool, 20% baby alpaca, 10% silk): #08 summer plum, 8 (10, 10, 11, 12, 13) balls. Yarn distributed by WEBS.

Construction: The body of this cardigan is worked in one piece to the underarm, then divided for working the fronts and back separately. The sleeves are worked flat and seamed.


Knitting Traditions, Fall 2017

fall knitting patterns

Steampunk Pullover by Julia Farwell-Clay

Knitting Traditions 2017 is dedicated to the Victorian era and the famous Great Exhibition of 1851. Many displays at the great exhibition proudly showed off steam-driven machinery that could speed up manufacturing and knitting. In this spirit, the Steampunk Sweater sports large cogs and “toothed” bands at the cuffs. Top hat optional!

Difficulty: Intermediate

Sizes: 32 (35.75, 39.75, 43.5, 47.25)” bust circumference.

Recommended Yarn: Lorna’s Laces Shepherd Sport (100% superwash merino wool): #60ns waistcoat (teal; MC), 5 (6, 7, 8, 9) skeins and #9ns pewter (gray; CC), 1 skein.

Construction: The body and sleeves of this pullover are worked in the round from the bottom to the yoke, then the pieces are joined for working the circular yoke.

Aviatrix Pullover by Denise Lavoie

This pullover is inspired by Baroness Elise Raymonde de Laroche, the first licensed female pilot. Elise’s aviation license photo shows her in a heavy white sweater that could keep her warm as she flew; our version includes grommets and lacing on the front. Add a little steampunk flair to your style with this fun, fashionable garment.

Difficulty: Easy

Sizes: 35 (39, 42.5, 46, 50, 53.5)” bust circumference.

Recommended Yarn: Neighborhood Fiber Co. Studio Chunky (100% superwash merino): Patterson Park, 3 (3, 4, 4, 5, 5) skeins.

Construction: The back and front of this pullover are worked back and forth in separate pieces, then joined at the shoulders using the three-needle bind-off. The sleeves are picked up from the armholes and worked back and forth in rows.

Haubergeon Sweater by Emma Welford

This gorgeous sweater is inspired by Britain’s 19th century Arts and Crafts movement, which looked back to the Middle Ages for beauty and inspiration. If you can’t find a blacksmith to make you a chain mail shirt, try knitting your own. The Haubergeon Sweater’s shapely fit and beautifully textured sleeves take chain mail to a whole new level.

Difficulty: Expert

Sizes: 30.25 (34.75, 38.25, 41.75, 46.25, 49.75)” bust circumference.

Recommended Yarn: The yarn originally used for this sweater, The Fibre Co. Organik, has been discontinued. A good substitute is The Fibre Co. Cumbria Worsted (60% merino wool, 30% brown masham, 10% mohair): Castlerigg, 4 (4, 5, 5, 6, 6) skeins.

Construction: The hem of this pullover is worked flat in two pieces, then the pieces are joined and the rest of body is worked in the round to the underarm. The sleeves are worked in the round from the bottom up, then the body and sleeves are joined to work the yoke and saddle shoulders.

I’m currently finishing up a long-standing WIP, PieceWork’s Santa Fe Turquoise Trail Scarf, which is already overdue for my mom’s birthday, but then I’ve promised myself I’ll cast on something for myself. The only question is, which of these stunning fall knitting projects will make the cut?

Which project are you most excited about? Let me know in the comments!

Yours in Stitches,
Andrea


Fall in Love with Interweave’s Gorgeous Fall Knitting Patterns

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