Aspen Pullover: You Are Here

I’ve been working on my Aspen Pullover for about a month, and it is moving right along! I made it through all of the sleeve and neck shaping. Now I’m on the downhill stretch, and I just need to finish up the back. Right now, it’s at the awkward poncho stage: it has a neck and some flappy bits, but it definitely doesn’t quite look like a sweater yet.

No, really, guys—I swear it’s a sweater!

No, really, guys—I swear it’s a sweater!

One of the neat things about the construction is that the beginning and end of the knitting are the easy parts. It starts out simply, with just two cables swirling up the front. As you work toward the neck, more cable patterns are added. You also cast on a boatload of stitches for the sleeves, so these rows are considerable longer. Then, once you get past the sleeves, things start to get easier again, with fewer stitches and cables. There’s a satisfying symmetry to it.

The construction allows the cables to flow over the shoulder and around the sleeve.

The construction allows the cables to flow over the shoulder and around the sleeve.

Considering I’ve only been working on this sweater during meetings and during slow moments at work, it’s going incredibly quickly. (One of the perks of working for a knitting magazine is that knitting a sweater is considered legitimate use of your time.) Most of my recent projects have been on size 3–5 needles. Everything goes so much faster on size 7 needles! Maybe I need to spend more time with reasonably-sized gauges. . .

Put it on backwards, and you’re Super Knitter!

Put it on backwards, and you’re Super Knitter!

The yarn is delightful. Rapture from Sugar Bush Yarns is a blend of Llama Soft and merino, making a super plush fabric. Llama Soft is a llama fiber that has been specially dehaired; in other words, they took out all the prickly guard hairs that can be poky and itchy. This leaves a mix of long, silky fibers from the llama’s main coat and short, fluffy fibers from its undercoat. Rapture blends these soft and silky fibers with merino wool (added to give the yarn more elasticity and memory) to create a warm yarn with just the right balance of drape and stretch.

At the rate I’m going, my Aspen Pullover should be ready before the end of the month. I’m looking forward to snuggling up in its soft and squishy warmth when proper sweater weather arrives.


Knit your own Aspen Pullover!