Quick and Easy Summertime Jewelry: Make a Sparkling Shell Ring

It's officially summer! In addition to splashy swimming pools, juicy watermelons, and blooming roses, nothing says summer to me like a warm sandy beach. I'm constantly inspired by long walks on the beach, picking up shells, wave-worn rocks and glass, and gnarled pieces of driftwood.

 
How cute would these rings be on your hand holding a frosty, fruity drink?

Making jewelry using shells is a great way to keep a special vacation with you all year long–and to remind yourself, in the dark days of winter, that summer isn't so far away. Celebrate summer with me by making this blingy, sparkle-tastic ring by Eleanore Macnish. You can purchase the shell or use one you find during a beach stroll; then just follow Eleanore's simple instructions to bling it up using Crystal Clay and rhinestones.  

Sparkling Shell Ring by Eleanore Macnish

Materials: 

shell ring
Crystal Clay kit
crystal rhinestone "chatons"
alcohol
paper towel
extra toothpick with pointed ends 

Steps:

1. Following the package instructions, take equal amounts of parts A and B (about the size of a pea) and knead them together for about two minutes so they are completely mixed.

2. Roll a small amount of the clay into a long, thin snake.

3. Clean the ring with alcohol and apply the snake of clay to the spiral indentation of the shell. Press slightly to anchor the clay.

4. Using the extra toothpick, shore up the sides of the clay snake coil to make it deeper and not as flat.

 

5. With the beeswax-coated toothpick included with your Crystal Clay, pick up a rhinestone and apply it to the clay, starting at the base.

6. Use the opposite (flat) end of that toothpick to push the rhinestone into the clay. Ideally, the outside edge of the rhinestone should be flush with the surface of the clay or a little bit deeper than the surface of the clay. Repeat until the coil is covered in crystals.

7. After you have set all the stones, using the pointed end of your extra toothpick, make an indention in the clay between each rhinestone, on the outside edges of the spiral of stones. This will form a "bezel" setting for each stone. Use your toothpick to pick off any extra clay as well.

8. Let your ring cure for 24 hours and enjoy!

 

3 Great Tips: 

Tip 1. Mounting putty is great to work out your ring designs and also for seeing how much clay you will need before mixing the two-part Crystal Clay. Be sure to clean off the ring with alcohol after you remove the putty and before you apply the epoxy clay.

 

Tip 2. You can also use texture plates to emboss designs in the clay.

Tip 3: You can achieve wonderful effects by lightly pressing the clay in mica powder (always wear a face mask when using mica powder), such as Pearl Ex pigments, before the clay cures.

Wait 24 hours for the clay to cure and scrub with a toothbrush under running water to remove the excess powder.
 —EM 

 

For more sparkling and fabulous fun jewelry-making projects, grab the sixteenth series of Beads, Baubles, and Jewels, available in a four-disc set now in the Jewelry Making Daily Shop! Join host Katie Hacker and other jewelry-making experts (such as Jean Campbell, Kristal Wick, Kim St. Jean, Candie Cooper, Susan Lenart Kazmer, Leslie Rogalski, Danielle Fox, and others) for over six hours of inspired how-to jewelry projects using wire, crystals, metal clay, beads, metal, fibers, and more! Divided into themes like bohemian, glamorous, romantic, natural, world traveler, and nostalgic, there's an episode with jewelry projects for everyone.

Resources:
shell ring $13-15 each from
BeadsAddict.com (Click on "About Us" and email them directly.)
Crystal Clay and Nunn Design crystal rhinestone "chatons" from
BelloModo.com

 

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