Net Profits: 3 Jewelry Artists Killing It — Off the Grid, Pt I

Craft shows and jewelry trade shows offer great ways to gain exposure and network with fellow makers, but sometimes your core customers are hanging out somewhere else – at a rock festival or microbrewery, for example.

“Some of the best marketing strategies have nothing to do with jewelry trade shows or sales reps,” says Hilary Halstead, whose company gives out the $7,500 Halstead Grant every year (deadline for submissions this year is August 1).

Here’s one of a few jewelry artists who successfully mine what Halstead calls “parallel cultural pockets.”

Allison Cimono of RockLove

RockLove designer Allison Cimono, a Halstead Grant finalist in 2009, is into punk music, having worked as a producer at a record label before discovering jewelry making. Her jewelry is inspired by the Goth and counter-culture crowd who follow the underground music scene. She does work driven by rock culture, sells at concerts, works with licensing and does things for bands.

Instead of showing at traditional trade shows like JCK, she finds her niche audience at the Ink-N-Iron Festival in Nashville and the Viva Las Vegas Rockabilly Weekend . She also rocks Instagram, with more than 11,000 followers!

Where besides jewelry venues would your jewelry be a natural?

PHOTOS: Courtesy of RockLove Jewelry

NET PROFITS is a regular feature about using the Internet for jewelry selling of special interest to those with a home-based jewelry business that appears in Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist. Learn more in “Mining Your Niche,” August 2017.


CATHLEEN MCCARTHY has written about jewelry and business for Town & Country, Art & Antiques, Washington Post, and her own site, The Jewelry Loupe. Follow her on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Pinterest.


Get more Net Profits in any issue of Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist