See Inside the Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist March 2020 Issue

Learn, sell, make, collect, respect, and win. Best show displays, personalized packaging, an education focus, a special look at the earth from many perspectives and a new competition — the March/April 2020 Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist has it all. Here’s the snapshot.

ABOVE: ZigZag cut by John Dyer & Co. in 3.96 cts of aquamarine from Tanzania; photo: Ozzie Campos

Smokin’ Water!

Its name means water of the sea, but in this new issue, aquamarine is the featured gem in Smokin’ Stones. It’s a classic, but it doesn’t have to look ordinary, as you can see in John Dyer’s extraordinary ZigZag cut.

Uncut

Noël Yovovich’s The Uncut Version ring project, March/April 2020 Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist; photo: Jim Lawson

Noël Yovovich’s The Uncut Version ring project, March/April 2020 Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist; photo: Jim Lawson

Jewelry artist Noël Yovovich loves gemstones, cut or otherwise. She picked up a small parcel of aquamarine crystal fragments years ago and loves to use them in her designs. Noël prong-set this piece of aqua so she could secure the stone just where it needed and leave most of it visible in all its funky form.

She Blew (or Is That Blue?) in on the Wind

Lexi Erickson’s Snow Queen pendant project, March/April 2020 Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist; photo: Jim Lawson

Lexi Erickson’s Snow Queen pendant project, March/April 2020 Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist; photo: Jim Lawson

Perhaps you’ve heard that Pantone has named a medium-dark blue its 2020 Color of the Year. The drusy chalcedony from South Africa Lexi Erickson chose as the central gem in her Snow Queen pendant is even closer to that shade than aquamarine, if that’s what you’re going for. The design popped into her head when she saw this stone after years of wanting to pay homage to the classic fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen. And if you are interested in more gem ideas for Classic Blue, be sure to check out Trends in the new issue, too.

Ring in the New

Jeff Fulkerson’s Look Through It ring project, March/April 2020 Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist; photo: Jim Lawson

Jeff Fulkerson’s Look Through It ring project, March/April 2020 Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist; photo: Jim Lawson

Hollow shanks let you design and create rings that have a lot of presence and volume without nearly the weight or price tag you’d be bearing if you went solid. Jeff Fulkerson constructed this strikingly sculptural ring with a hollow silver shank, then added stones and an opening to the sides, just for fun.

Chriso de Nero cabochons, mined and cut by Erik Martinez, March/April 2020 Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist; cabochons courtesy Dikra Gems; photo: Jim Landon

Chriso de Nero cabochons, mined and cut by Erik Martinez, March/April 2020 Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist; cabochons courtesy Dikra Gems; photo: Jim Landon

Like Montana Agate with More Color

Erik Martinez is mining an area in the northwest U.S. for this way cool new agate, which he calls Chriso de Nero. If you’re familiar with classic Montana agate’s colorless ground showcasing areas of black and shades of brown, Chriso de Nero will certainly bring that to mind, only this agate has blues, greens, and reds, too. Wow! Learn more about it from Jim Landon in Facets.

They Don’t Start Out on Nice Velvet Pads at Shows

Stilbite with analcime, 5.4cm across, Five Islands, Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia, Canada; March/April 2020 Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist; specimen and photo: Ray McDougall

Stilbite with analcime, 5.4cm across, Five Islands, Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia, Canada; March/April 2020 Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist; specimen and photo: Ray McDougall

April 22 is the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, so we thought we’d give the planet a particularly gem, mineral, and jewelry spin. If you’ve never been field collecting for mineral specimens (as above) or gem rough, check out the feature story “Wild Caught”: it’s a real eye-opener. If you’re interested in collecting in the field yourself, you’ll also find valuable insights from experienced hands about how to do so responsibly. You’ll also want to enjoy the armchair visit to a working commercial onyx quarry in “Onyx Economics.”

Where Should You Start to Learn Jewelry Making?

Charles Lewton Brain teaching jewelry classes

Goldsmith, teacher, innovator and so much more Charles Lewton-Brain addressing a jewelry class; March/April 2020 Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist; photo: Dwayne Norman

I couldn’t think of anyone better to ask about designing your own jewelry-making curriculum than Charles Lewton-Brain. I was thrilled when he agreed to share his insight and advice on the subject. Whether you’re new to the craft or have been at it for years, you’ll learn something new about learning in “Be Your Own School.” You’ll also find “Lessons Learned” a worthwhile read as three jewelry instructors explain how they learned, and how their own education influences their approach to teaching today.

State of the Earth

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In “Say It with Jewelry,” five jewelry artists describe the kinds of jewelry they create that are inspired by our planet, from expressing their concern about the environment to their fascination with our place in the heavens. And in “Friendly All Around,” you can learn how to ensure your own safety in your studio and to minimize undesired impact on the wider world around you.

Big Picture in Miniature

E. Douglas Wunder’s Earth from Above pendant project, March/April 2020 Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist; photo: Jim Lawson

E. Douglas Wunder’s Earth from Above pendant project, March/April 2020 Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist; photo: Jim Lawson

For most of his life, E. Douglas Wunder has been inspired by images we on earth have sent back from space. The layers of his three-tiered pendant are riveted titanium. Two are anodized to create the colors for land and ocean, topped by a layer of ethereal clouds of unanodized titanium.

Call for Entries

Carla Pennie Jewelry Design; photo: Jim Lawson

Carla Pennie Jewelry Design; photo: Jim Lawson

One more thing! As you look through the projects and shorts in this issue, you’ll also find calls for entry to a new contest. Don’t miss your chance to win one of the 1st Annual Interweave Jewelry, Bead and Gem Arts Awards. This new contest is open for entries now.

Merle White is Editor-in-Chief of Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist.

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