Simply Elegant Monogram Wine Coasters

Author

Josi Hannon Madera

Introduction

These Filet Crochet letter charts work up quickly and are a romantic addition to any table.

One of the beautiful aspects of Filet Crochet is that any hook/yarn combination that works together will create a completed piece in the pattern you select — all that changes from one hook to the next is the size of your completed project. For that reason, you can create a small wine coaster and a larger matching doily for the wine bottle using the same thread and different hook sizes. You could even go up to a fingering weight yarn and an aluminum hook and use the same charts to create decorative monogram placemats.

Gauge

Filet Crochet can also be worked a few different ways. Traditional filet uses {3 dc} for a block and {2 ch, 1 dc} for a space. However, you can also get a tighter, more closed-up effect by using {2 hdc} for a block and {1 ch, 1 hdc} for a space — the coaster in the photograph is an example of hdc filet (#10 thread, 2.25mm Steel Hook).

The Pattern

A guideline for these charts and my recommended yarn/hooks:

Thread Size Hook Which Piece Stitch for Open Block
#10 Steel 2 (2.25mm) Bottle ch 1, hdc
  Steel 6 (1.60mm) Glass ch 1, hdc
#20 Steel 6 (1.60mm) Bottle ch 2, dc
  Steel 10 (1.15mm) Glass ch 2, dc

Click on the Monogram to view Large-Sized Photo (will open in new window).

 

For those new to filet crochet, here are the basics:

US Pattern Notations Used
ch = chain
hdc = half double crochet
dc = double crochet
sl st = slip stitch
trc = treble crochet

For hdc filet

Each block is worked as 2 hdc.

Each space is worked as {1 ch, 1 hdc}.

Each row is started with a ch 2 and the first stitch of the previous row is skipped. Begin the first stitch of the first block in the second stitch of each row. (In other words, starting chain does not count as part of the first block in a row).

To begin, count the number of blocks in the first row.

The base chain is double the number of blocks in the first row + 3 (counts as a ch & starting hdc of first row). For example, all of these monograms have a bottom row of 10 blocks, so the starting chain is (10 * 2) + 3 = 23 chains.

First stitch of first row is worked into 4th ch from hook (first 3 ch count as 1 base-ch & 1st hdc of this row).

To increase at the beginning of a row, ch 4, work first stitch of first block in 4th ch from hook.

To increase at the end of row – work {1 dc into same space as last hdc worked & 1 dc into bottom of dc just worked}.

To decrease at the beginning of row – ch 1, sl st into the first st, {sl st into the next stitch} x 2, ch 2, work first stitch of first block into next stitch.

For dc filet

Each block is worked as 3 dc.

Each space is worked as {2 ch, 1 dc}.

Each row is started with a ch 3 and the first stitch of the previous row is skipped. Begin the first stitch of the first block in the second stitch of each row. (In other words, starting chain does not count as part of the first block in a row).

To begin, count the number of blocks in the first row.

The base chain is triple the number of blocks in the first row + 4 (counts as a ch & starting dc of first row). For example, all of these monograms have a bottom row of 10 blocks, so the starting chain is (10 * 3) + 4 = 34 chains.

First stitch of first row is worked into 5th ch from hook (first 4 ch count as 1 base-ch & 1st dc of this row).

To increase at the beginning of a row, ch 6, work first stitch of first block in 5th ch from hook.

To increase at the end of row – {1 trc into same space as last dc worked, **1 trc into bottom of trc just worked** x 2}.

To decrease at the beginning of row – {ch 1, sl st into the first st, **sl st into the next stitch** x 3, ch 3, work first stitch of first block into next stitch}.

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