One Scarf, So Many Options

 


My gift-giving list for the coming holidays is growing! After penning a comprehensive list last week of friends and family (it currently numbers 21), I perused my yarn stash, choosing yarns in appropriate colors and fiber contents for each person on the list. I have drawers full of leftover yarn-a ball of this, a couple skeins of that. Because of the size of my list and my goal to handcraft all of my presents using stash yarn, I think the gifts this year will be individualized accessories. Scarves spring to mind.

Everyone loves scarves. They are very in-fashion this season and, I find, easily individualized with a little help from the Crocheter's Companion.

I love the stitch pattern in the Stone City Scarf (Interweave Crochet Fall 2008). The easily memorized stitch patterns works up quickly, the variegated yarn adds yet more visual interest, and the crochet covered rings are so playful. The original version skillfully walks the border between elegant and playful.



     

 


With some leftover green yarn I worked the base of the Stone City Scarf. With the solid color, the stitch pattern really shines. Now what happens if I turn to the Crocheter's Companion for a bit of help? The corkscrew fringe quickly caught my eye. The finished scarf is more playful than the original.

     

Inspired by my first variation, I used yarn leftover from the last scarf along with a coordinating blue and red to work up a striped scarf. A section of fringes caught my attention this time though. Which do you like best: the plain fringe or the knotted lattice fringe?

 
 

Now my mind is full of ideas. I could add braids to the end of the scarf or edge it in a shell or picot border. A group of crocheted buttons or flowers would be a marvelous addition either collected in a corner or dispersed along the length. The Crocheter's Companion also includes information on crocheting with beads. This pattern would really sparkle with well-placed beads. What other ideas do you have to make this scarf pattern your own? Check out more ideas for embellishing in the Crocheter's Companion.

Best wishes,

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