Learn How to Seam Crochet with Whipstitch Seams

The last instruction for any crochet sweater can be the most intimidating. You’ve mastered the stitch pattern; figured out the increases, decreases, and shaping; finally worked your last stitch; and woven in all the ends. The final step before you can wear your gorgeous new crochet sweater is the seaming. If seaming crochet intimidates you, don’t feel like you are alone. Seaming crochet intimidates many people. I even know people who have crochet sweaters that have languished for years in their WIP pile waiting to be seamed.

seaming crochet sweaters from The Crochetist

The Fullerene Pullover, Rhythmite Pullover, and Huitre Top from The Crochetist are easy to finish with the whipstitch seam.

But fear no more! Today we are going to look at whip stitch seaming. Several sweaters including the Huitre Top and Rhythmite Pullover in The Crochetist use this easy seaming stitch. Other sweaters, like the Fullerene Pullover simply instruct you to seam or sew the edges or pieces together allowing you to choose your favorite crochet seam for the piece.

Before you begin seaming, here are three tips to keep in mind.

3 Tips for Seaming Success

1. Before seaming, read the entire finishing instructions. Some crochet patterns instruct you to block before seaming and others seam before blocking. Some shorter seams, such as those at a collar, are worked with a long tail that you leave when you begin crocheting that section.

2. Depending on your confidence in your seaming and the size of the seam, you may want to pin your seams. If you are seaming along the ends of rows, line the rows up evenly so that the sweater sits evening and looks straight at the seams. If you are seaming along the top or bottom of a row, pinning will help ensure you don’t get to the end of the seam and discover that one side is longer than the other.

3. Play with your seaming yarn. In most instances, you should match your seaming yarn with the yarn you crocheted with. If you use a different color, you will be able to see it in the seam. In some instances that might be fun. Maybe you want to whipstitch a pocket onto the front of your crochet sweater in a contrasting color. As a personal tip, when I am seaming a bulky or super bulky project, I often look for a lighter weight yarn in the same color to create a cleaner, less bulky seam.

How to Whipstitch Seam Crochet

Okay, let’s learn how to whipstitch seam. Hold wrong sides (RS) of the two pieces your are seaming together. The right side is the side of the sweater that will end up being shown on the outside. Find the wrong side of both pieces you are seaming together and hold them together. Cut a length of your seaming yarn and thread it on a yarn needle. Some people recommend weaving in the end of your seaming yarn before you begin. I usually leave a tail and come back and weave it in when I am done seaming. I used a contrasting colored yarn so that the whipstitches were easier to see.

whipstitch seaming crochet

Insert your needle through both sides of the fabric. I am right handed, so I insert the yarn from right to left. You want to insert the needle far enough down to securely hold the seam, but not so far that you will create a bulky seam. Pull the stitch tight enough so that it is secure and to minimize the visibility of the stitch on the right side.

whipstitch seaming crochet

Insert the needle again from right to left through both pieces wrapping the yarn over the top of the pieces you are holding together. Make sure your stitches are close enough together to create a secure seam without holes. When you finish your seam, securely weave in you ends. It is a good idea to practice on your gauge square.

whipstitch seaming crochet

Notice how the deeper stitches are more visible on the right side of the fabric. In a matching yarn, this would not be as noticeable.

See? Easy! The crochet seam will intimidate you no more. Get your copy of The Crochetist and add gorgeous crochet sweaters to your wardrobe this fall.

Happy crocheting,
Toni


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