How to Crochet a Sweater: 3 Construction Methods

How do you envision crocheting a sweater? For me, there’s one construction method I’ve stuck with. I tend to crochet the front, back, and sleeves in pieces, then seam them all together when I’m finished.

Boy, have I been missing out! There are so many other ways to make a sweater! Interweave Crochet Fall 2018 features a range of other ways to construct a crochet sweater. Read on to discover three different methods. Which is your favorite?

1. Bottom up, in pieces, then seamed.

This is often the most straightforward, and for me, intuitive way to construct a crochet sweater. Start at the bottom, maybe with some ribbing, and work your way toward the neckline. Do the same with the sleeves starting at the cuff and working toward the shoulder. Once each piece is finished, seam them all together into a garment. Try this with Shannon Mullett-Bowlsby’s Dashing Cardigan while also trying out the shadow stitch cable technique!

Dashing Cardigan | Photo Credit: Harper Point Photography

Dashing Cardigan | Photo Credit: Harper Point Photography

Alternative: Top down, in pieces, then seamed.
Similarly, you can work the sweater pieces from the top down and then seam them. This just means you start at the neckline and work your way down for the body pieces and start at the shoulder and work your way down to the cuff for the sleeves. When each piece is finished, seam them all together. If you’d like to try this construction method, try Ashlyn Holmes’ Cultivated Pullover.

Cultivated Pullover | Photo Credit: Harper Point Photography

Cultivated Pullover | Photo Credit: Harper Point Photography

2. Top down, in the round.

The best part about a top-down, in-the-round sweater? No seams! And if you’re working from the top down, you just need to know how to increase. This type of sweater construction is seen in raglans (with increases at the corners) and circular yokes (increases evenly dispersed around the neckline/circle). Then you separate for the body and sleeves and continue working in the round. Try this out with the Suave Sweater from Isa Catepillán.

Suave Sweater | Photo Credit: Harper Point Photography

Suave Sweater | Photo Credit: Harper Point Photography

Alternative: Bottom up, in the round.
Anything that is worked from the top down can also be worked from the bottom up. You just need to decrease stitches rather than increase them as you move toward the neck.

3. Side-to-side.

We don’t often get the chance to work sweaters from side to side. Amy Gunderson’s Worldly Cardigan is your chance to try out this construction method and see what you think. Rather than starting at the bottom or top, the front, back, and sleeves start at one side and move toward the opposite side. With this construction method, the natural lines that tend to appear as you work each row will appear vertical on the body rather than horizontal. We all love switching up our texture patterns from time to time!

Worldly Cardigan | Photo Credit: Harper Point Photography

Worldly Cardigan | Photo Credit: Harper Point Photography

Have you tried any of these construction methods? Hope this helped with any questions on how to crochet a sweater! Let us know in the comments below, and share your finished projects from Interweave Crochet Fall 2018 on Ravelry!

Happy stitching!
Sara

(Featured Image: Bottom up Dashing Cardigan, in the round Suave Sweater, side to side Worldly Cardigan | Photo Credit: Harper Point Photography)


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