The Crochetist 2019 Crochet Patterns Are Here!

Last year, we at Interweave Crochet released a brand new digital collection, The Crochetist. The goal of the crochet pattern collection was to create pieces that captured an elegant, stylish aesthetic while also being approachable for crocheters looking to add to their handmade wardrobe. The capsule collection focused on basic shaping, subtle textures, and smooth lines to create sophisticated, timeless pieces.

I always look forward to the individual crochet patterns from a publication coming out for people to enjoy, because it means that I have the pleasure of going back and looking over the collections once again. The Crochetist is no different: I’m still in awe of the gorgeous lines and subtle textures that make up this collection. Normally, I am limited by quantity as to how much I can wax poetic about different handmade pieces. But since this collection is eminently approachable, with three gorgeous accessories and three charming garments, I thought I would take time to introduce each of them (if you haven’t seen them already).

Meet the Crochet Patterns in The Crochetist

The Clast Cap by Lisa Naskrent

The Clast Cap by Lisa Naskrent

1. The Clast Cap by Lisa Naskrent

The stitch pattern on this delightful hat gives it an appealing texture, like pebbles on a beach. The pattern is similar to the popcorn stitch, but is worked without dropping a loop from the hook. Even better, this piece uses only two skeins of yarn!

The Rhythmite Pullover by Natasha Robarge

The Rhythmite Pullover by Natasha Robarge

2. The Rhythmite Pullover by Natasha Robarge

This delightfully airy sweater is perfect for spring, worked using a pattern that gives the pattern both stretch and breathability. The front and back of the sweater are worked side-to-side in one piece, and the sleeves are crocheted separately.

The Wafture Cowl by Kylie Lamb

The Wafture Cowl by Kylie Lamb

3. The Wafture Cowl by Kylie Lamb

This cowl is the ideal accessory for the colder months of the year: it can be worn as a long infinity scarf or wrapped twice for extra warmth. The pattern is easily memorized and, like the Clast Cap, doesn’t take that much yarn to make!

The Huitre Top by Natasha Robarge

The Huitre Top by Natasha Robarge

4. The Huitre Top by Natasha Robarge

If you’re looking to challenge yourself this year, the Huitre Top might be ideal. The sweater is crocheted bottom up in pieces before being stitched together. The blend of cotton and angora fiber used for this pullover creates a breathable, cozy fabric that you’ll want to snuggle into every day.

The Pruina Shawl by Toni Lipsey

The Pruina Shawl by Toni Lipsey

5. The Pruina Shawl by Toni Lipsey

This minimalist shawl can be worn in a multitude of ways. The pattern uses lacy V-stitches interspersed with solid rows to create a rhythmic, meditative pattern for stitching.

The Fullerene Pullover by Jane Howorth

The Fullerene Pullover by Jane Howorth

6. The Fullerene Pullover by Jane Howorth

This cozy sweater is worked from cuff to cuff, giving it a roomy, cozy drape when worn. The name comes from an allotrope of carbon that has bonds that create a mesh-like appearance, just like this pullover’s stitch pattern.

If you haven’t been able to explore the crochet patterns in The Crochetist before now, I encourage you to do so. Who knows? Perhaps the perfect pattern to start the new year is just waiting for you!

Be sure to count your stitches!
Julia

All images by Caleb Young.


Explore more sophisticated patterns!

Post a Comment