3 Brilliant Ideas to Perfect Your Crochet Cables!

I have always loved crochet cables! Post stitches create fantastic texture and intricate designs. I do, however, have one great frustration when it comes to crochet cables: the holes that appear on the sides as the stitches start to cross. Luckily, we work with some incredible crochet designers, and a few of them have developed methods to fix this problem. Read on to discover each designer’s approach to fixing holes in crochet cables.

1. Brenda K. B. Anderson’s Stitch Combinations

Brenda developed a great technique for eliminating the holes on the sides of cables when she wrote the pattern for the Venturesome Mittens from Interweave Crochet Fall 2018. Brenda uses the extended single crochet stitch (esc) as the background stitch for her mittens and front post double crochet (FPdc) and front post treble crochet (FPtr) to create the cables. As she switches from the extended single crochet to the post stitches, she combines the stitches into one stitch that has parts of each. Combining these stitches keeps them closer together so no holes appear! For a full description of how to combine the stitches, check out Interweave Crochet Fall 2018.

The Venturesome Mittens combine extended single crochet stitches with post stitches. | Photo Credit: Harper Point Photography

The Venturesome Mittens combine extended single crochet stitches with post stitches. | Photo Credit: Harper Point Photography

2. Sue Perez’s Live Loop Method

I tried Sue’s live-loop method for crochet cables as soon as her article landed in my inbox. It’s a smart combination of knitting and crochet. The background is a simple crochet stitch, and the cables are created with a knit-like I-cord that works up the surface of the project. Grab Interweave Crochet Fall 2017 for a hat or mitt pattern to try it out.

The Blue Spruce Hat uses live-loop stitches to create its cable pattern. | Photo Credit: Harper Point Photography

The Blue Spruce Hat uses live-loop stitches to create its cable pattern. | Photo Credit: Harper Point Photography

3. Shannon Mullett-Bowlsby’s Shadow Stitches

This clever technique features a shadow-stitch row (the right side row with cables and post stitches) and a return row (the wrong side row with simple stitches). You’re working an extra set of stitches behind your cable stitches so there are no holes and the fabric is extra-warm. Try it out in the Dashing Cardigan from Interweave Crochet Fall 2018.

The Dashing Cardigan uses shadow stitches to create its cable pattern. | Photo Credit: Harper Point Photography

The Dashing Cardigan uses shadow stitches to create its cable pattern. | Photo Credit: Harper Point Photography

Have you tried any of these cable techniques? Which one worked the best for you? Let us know in the comments below!

Happy stitching!
Sara

(Featured Image: Venturesome Mittens, Blue Spruce Hat, Dashing Cardigan. | Photo Credit: Harper Point Photography)


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