Shaped Beads Inspire New Designs

Whenever we’re talking about two-hole beads, I’m drawn back to the first two-hole bead I met – the good ol’ two-hole tile bead (said like it’s 100 years old when really, that was only about 4 years ago!).

Tile bracelet by Kassie Shaw

Tile bracelet by Kassie Shaw (Inman)

Here are two designs featuring two-hole tile beads, from one of the first issues of Beadwork magazine to feature this then, hot new bead.

Tile bracelet by Sheri Caruso

Tile bracelet by Sheri Caruso

This innovative new bead shape with two-holes really set the stage for so many new design directions, and started the ever-growing list of shaped beads.

Today, new two-hole, single-hole, and four-hole shaped beads seem to keep popping up, and they continue to delight, intrigue, and inspire us to try new stitches and new designs. In some cases though, we get new designs just by changing the bead! As a quick example – here is a basic even-count peyote woven seed bead bracelet.

Event count peyote bracelet, Tammy Honaman, size 8/0 seed beads

Event count peyote bracelet, Tammy Honaman, size 8/0 seed beads

And here are swatches of shaped beads worked up using peyote stitch – each different and wonderful in their own way, yet  made using the same stitch.

Shaped beads woven using even-count peyote stitch

Shaped beads woven using even-count peyote stitch

From Melinda Barta’s Peyote Stitch Companion eBook:
When working flat peyote stitch with two-hole seed beads (including SuperDuos, Twins, and Bi-bo beads), string the beads for Rows 1 and 2 as you would for regular flat peyote stitch (blue thread). When working Row 3, pass through the top hole of every other bead in the starting strand (red thread). Note: SuperUnos (a variation of SuperDuos with just one hole) can be used for the first and last rows of flat peyote stitch.

Even count peyote stitch thread path through two-hole shaped beads

Even count peyote stitch thread path through two-hole shaped beads

When working with two-hole shaped beads, and tiles especially, you might find your threads show even more along the edges when making turns than when using standard seed beads. To help with this, Consider adding a bead embellishment to camouflage that thread. Also from the Peyote Stitch Companion – here size 15° or 11° seed beads are added between rows of two-hole tiles.

Embellish the edges of tile beads using size 15/0 seed beads

Embellish the edges of tile beads using size 15/0 seed beads

Fast forward 3 years and we now have a smattering of new two-hole and shaped beads to design with. Check out some of the beautiful designs featured in the most recent Stitching with Shaped Beads: 10 Beading Projects to Make with Tile & Brick Beads, just released!

Icelandia by Christina Neit 2 different two-hole bead shapes stitched using right-angle weave, netting, flat and circular peyote stitch, and picot

Icelandia by Christina Neit
2 different two-hole bead shapes stitched using right-angle weave, netting, flat and circular peyote stitch, and picot

Botanic Gardens Bracelet by Svetlana Chernitsky 2 different two-hole shape beads stitched using netting and fringe

Botanic Gardens Bracelet by Svetlana Chernitsky
2 different two-hole shape beads stitched using netting and fringe

 

Whistle Stop Bracelet by Marcia L. Balonis 3 different two-hole bead shapes stitched using netting, brick-stitch edging, and picot

Whistle Stop Bracelet by Marcia L. Balonis
3 different two-hole bead shapes stitched using netting, brick-stitch edging, and picot

There are 7 other fabulous designs in the new  eBbook – be sure to check it out! And if you have a favorite tile or brick bead design we would LOVE to see it. Please leave a comment below or add your image to our member gallery.

Happy beading,

blue_tammy

Post a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.