How to Bead a Triangular Peyote Stitch Rope

I was speaking with a fellow bead designer the other day who said she liked to approach design as an architect would–focusing more on the bricks (beads) than the mortar (thread). I loved the way she described the way she uses two-hole beads to form corners and build layers.

But then I started thinking about how I construct my designs… I guess I depend a lot on the mortar, too! I depend on manipulating my thread paths so that my beads snap into positions that will achieve my desired shapes. There are dozens of tricks you can use to make this happen. One of my favorites is to intersperse herringbone stitch and peyote stitch to bead a rope, like I did for my Avifauna bracelet:

Jean Campbell- Avifauna birds eye 2

Many of you have stitched individual triangles and sewed them together to form shapes, but this design is created by alternating herringbone stitch and peyote stitch along the length of the rope to make a spiky rope. Here’s generally how to bead a triangular peyote stitch rope like the one shown above:

You’ll need:

Size 15° seed beads (A)
Size 11° Delicas (B)
Size 11° seed beads in three different colors (C), (D) and (E)
3mm crystal pearl or glass rounds (F)
FireLine 6lb braided beading thread
Size 12 beading needle
Scissors

Rows 1 and 2: Tie a tension bead at the end of 7′ of thread, leaving a 6″ tail. String {2B and 1F} to the desired length (Figure 1, black thread). String 2B.

Row 3: String 1C and pass back through the last F added in the previous row; repeat to the end. Exit through the end 1B, toward the center of the work (Figure 1, red thread).

fig 1

Note: It’s a good idea to stop/start threads in Row 3 to reinforce the bracelet.

Row 4: *Working with very tight tension, string 2B and pass through the next B to form a herringbone stitch. String 1E and pass through the next F to form a peyote stitch. String 1E and pass through the next B to form another peyote stitch. Repeat from * across the row. End with a 2B herringbone stitch.  Note: This row is very squirrelly! Just be patient and try to tease out the pattern.

Row 5: Work 1 herringbone stitch with 2B and 3 peyote stitches with 1E in each stitch; repeat across the row. End with a 2B herringbone stitch.

Row 6: Work 1 herringbone stitch with 2B and 4 peyote stitches with 1E in each stitch; repeat across the row. End with a 2B herringbone stitch.

Row 7: Work 1 herringbone stitch with 2B, 1 peyote stitch with 1E, 3 peyote stitches with 1D in each stitch, and 1 peyote stitch with 1E; repeat across the row. End with a 2B herringbone stitch.

Row 8: Work 1 herringbone stitch with 2B and 6 peyote stitches with 1D in each stitch; repeat across the row. End with a 2B herringbone stitch.

Row 9: Work 1 herringbone stitch with 2B and 7 peyote stitches with 1D in each stitch; repeat across the row. End with a 2B herringbone stitch.

Row 10: String 1F and 1A; pass back through the F and pass down through the next B. Work 8 peyote stitches with 1D in each stitch (Figure 2–shows one repeat); repeat across the row. String 1F and 1A; pass back through the F and pass down through the next B.

fig 2

Many designers use this alternating-stitches trick, but U.K. designer Jean Power is the master at it! She mixes herringbone stitch and peyote stitch, forming beautiful three-dimensional geometric shapes to form sleek, modern designs. Check out her Bead Stitching Triangles video to learn much more about using multiple stitches to form the shapes you desire. BONUS: Today, you can save big on all of our products! Spend $40, $50, or $60 and save $10, $20, or $30 with code SAVE10, SAVE20, or SAVE30.

Happy beading!

Jean

Jean Cox, Beading Editorial Director

 

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