Hidden Clasps – Innovative and Intriguing

There is something fun about hiding a clasp inside a finished piece of jewelry. It becomes a kind of secret you have from the viewer. And when an admirer asks “How do you put that design on and take it off?,” there’s likely a satisfied smile crossing the wearer’s face, especially if they are also the maker.

This is a basic two-part clasp originally purchased to be “hidden” inside polymer clay – it has grooves and twists apart making it ideal for this use.

Twist Barrel Clasp

Twist Barrel Clasp

Using and hiding this clasp inside polymer was an idea Pier Voulkos shared during a polymer conference back in the 90s. You can “see” Pier’s use of this idea in her design, “Star Fruit Bead Necklace,” made in 1996.

"Star Fruit Bead Necklace," by Pier Voulkos, 1996

“Star Fruit Bead Necklace,” by Pier Voulkos, 1996

This large bead necklace by Ford and Forlano is another example of a clasp concealed in polymer. Each half of the clasp is concealed in half of a bead (Note: the halves don’t match – so love that!)

Ford and Forlano, big bead necklace, 1990s, polymer clay, www.fordforlano.com

Ford and Forlano, big bead necklace, 1990s, www.fordforlano.com

snap being stitched into place within beadwork

snap being stitched into place within beadwork

Clasps can also be concealed inside beadwork. Snaps are a great go-to for this type of work, as they are easily stitched into place.

The design, “Hercules Knot Bracelet,” by Carole Horn, is finished with a snap. The snap is integrated into a woven peyote strip that is fed through loops on each end of tubular herringbone woven sections that comprise the “knot.”

Tubular herringbone sections are connected together forming the "Hercules" knot in this bracelet design by Carole Horn.

Tubular herringbone sections are connected together forming the “Hercules” knot in this bracelet design by Carole Horn.

 

 

 

From Carol “The Greeks believed Hercules used this knot to protect the people he loved. The Romans tied it into the belts of brides on their wedding day. Make your own version of this ancient token of good luck using tubular herringbone stitch with an interchangeable crystal closure.”

The underside of the peyote strip.

The underside of the peyote strip.

 

 

 

The peyote strip closure works as a decorative element and features a bezel-set rivoli and fringe cluster on the front.

 

"Hercules Knot Bracelet," by Carole Horn, tubular herringbone, peyote, fringe, bezel set rivoli.

“Hercules Knot Bracelet,” by Carole Horn, tubular herringbone, peyote, fringe, bezel set rivoli.

“Heroine” necklace, by Jean Power is another clever design with a concealed clasp.

Jean Power's "Heroine" necklace features bold geometric shapes, a reversible rivoli focal which is stitched into the "clasp." The clasp is woven sections that connect together using concealed magnetic clasps.

Jean Power’s “Heroine” necklace features bold geometric shapes, a reversible rivoli focal which is stitched into the “clasp.” The clasp is woven sections that connect together using concealed magnetic clasps.

magnetic clasp stitched into place

magnetic clasp stitched into place

The clasp is hidden in the center triangle. Each section of the triangle has half of a magnetic clasp stitched into place.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clasp sections and focal showing the reverse of the rivoli feature.

Clasp sections and focal showing the reverse of the rivoli feature.

In addition to the cleverly hidden clasp stitched into each section of the triangle, the center component has  different color rivoli on the reverse, making this necklace interchangeable and reversible.

The instructions for both the “Hercules Knot” and “Heroine Necklace” can be found in the “Mythical Beading Collection.” A compilation of designs reminiscent of Greek and Roman style. Check them out and find your next favorite design to make.

blue_tammy

 

 

 

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