Circular Netting: The Hero of Multi-Hole Beads

One of the newer stitches to the scene, circular netting is the hero of multi-hole shaped beads. It allows thread paths to be worked circularly through “inside” and “outside” holes, radiating a structure out from a central point. It is great for earrings and pendants, but also works well for creating components to connect into a bracelet or necklace. Its versatility and usefulness has no bounds!

Circular netting with seed beads.

Circular netting with seed beads.

Circular Netting Step-By-Step

For circular netting, string {1A and 1B} six times; pass through the beads again to form a circle for the foundation round and pass through the next 1A. *String 1A, 1B, and 1A; skip 1 bead and pass through the following bead in the previous round to form a “net.” Repeat from * five times, then step up for the next round by passing through the first 2 beads of the first net. String 2A, 1B, and 2A; pass through the middle bead of the nearest net in the previous round. Repeat five times, then step up for the next round by passing through the first 3 beads of this round. Work each round the same way, increasing the number of A beads as necessary to keep the work flat, and stepping up by passing through the first half of the first net.

The Projects

The August/September issue of Beadwork magazine is a treasure trove of beautiful bead weaving stitches, but four projects have circular netting front and center. This diverse and gorgeous bunch showcase this stitch’s ability to create all kinds of beaded jewelry, ranging from delicate and elaborately detailed to geometric and bold.

Floret Post Earrings
Vezsuzsi’s Floret Post Earrings

Vezsuzsi’s Floret Post Earrings

Vezsuzsi uses circular netting to stitch a beautiful pair of floral-inspired beaded-bead earrings using DropDuos. Using circular netting gives these earrings the ability to become a three-dimensional object, adding interest to the overall design.

Serendipity Pendant
Becky Mitchell’s Serendipity Pendant

Becky Mitchell’s Serendipity Pendant

Becky Mitchell was playing with crescent beads and circular netting when she discovered that pushing down on the center pearl of this dimensional pendant causes the crescent beads to pop up. It was this serendipitous design feature that earned the pendant its name. From there, it was just a matter of fitting shapes and colors together and letting circular netting work its magic.

Sunflower Bracelet
Keiko Okamoto’s Sunflower Bracelet

Keiko Okamoto’s Sunflower Bracelet

Keiko Okamoto uses CzechMates diamonds and cabochons to weave sculptural flower components, then joins them to make this deceptively simple bracelet. By arranging the diamond beads into two rows and using circular netting to join it all together, you can make these components in just a few passes of thread.

Nila Pendant
Rangashrii Santhanam’s Nila Pendant

Rangashrii Santhanam’s Nila Pendant

Bezel a large oval stone using Amos par Puca beads, seed beads, and crystals. Circular netting is the star of this elegant pendant, encasing the whole back of the central Swarovski stone to hold it in place.

Circular netting is an easy-to-follow stitch that can be lacy or structural, and I find myself coming back to it again and again for using shaped beads, bezeling crystals, and more!

Meredith Steele
Technical Editor, Beadwork magazine


Find more circular netting projects in the Interweave Store:

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