Mastering Short-Rows

How many of you have the exact measurements of a knitted garment? Probably not many of us. That's why short-rows are a crucial knitting technique to master.

    
A wrapped stitch is the first step in working a short-row.

They help a pattern fit over those not-so-perfect areas of your body, making it skim over your belly or behind instead of clinging unattractively. I use short-rows in almost every sweater I knit, adding a couple of inches at the bust so the front of the sweater hangs evenly with the back. Those of you with large-busts can relate, right? Short-rows are also helpful in the same way if you have a pot-belly. If you want your sweater to hang low enough in the front and not ride up, short-rows are the answer.

The wrap-and-turn technique is really easy to learn; the challenge for me was picking up the wrapped stitches so that they didn't show on the right side of the work. I got the knit side right, but the purl side had me stumped and I have a couple of sweaters that have rogue bumps showing here and there.

Below are directions for wrapping and turning and then picking up the wraps correctly:

  Knit side facing: Knit the required number of stitches to the turning point, slip the next stitch purlwise to the right needle (Figure 1), bring the yarn to the front between the needles, return the slipped stitch to the left needle (Figure 2), bring the working yarn to the back between the needles, and turn the work so that the purl side is facing—one stitch has been wrapped and the yarn is correctly positioned to purl the next stitch. To hide the wrap on a subsequent knit row, : knit to the wrapped stitch, insert the tip of the right needle into both wrap and the wrapped stitch (Figure 3), and knit them together. This forces the turning yarn (the "wrap") to the back (wrong-side) of the fabric.    Purl side facing: Purl to the turning point, slip the next stitch purlwise to the right needle, bring the yarn to the back of the work (Figure 1), return the slipped stitch to the left needle, bring the yarn to
the front between the needles (Figure 2), then turn the work so that the knit side is facing-one
stitch has been wrapped and the yarn is correctly positioned to knit the next stitch. To hide the wrap on a subsequent purl row,
work to the wrapped stitch, use the tip of the right needle to pick up the turning yarn from the back, place it on the left needle (Figure 3), then purl it together with the wrapped stitch.
 

Out new Knitting Daily Workshop: Short Row Knitting with Nancie Wiseman will help you master short-rows and use them expertly in many situations. Here's Nancie to tell you more:

Download the video now (or pre-order the DVD!) and get started with short-rows now. You'll love being able to easily alter your knitwear for a perfect fit.

Cheers,

P.S. Have you used short-rows? Share your experience with us below in the comments!

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