Learn Something New: The Slip-Stitch Crochet Seam

    
Mosaic Tile Afghan
by Judith L. Schwarz

I have three afghans in the works, and they're all knitted in blocks and then sewn together.

Although there's a lot of finishing work involved in these types of knitted blankets, I don't mind. The trade off is that they're portable and each block is a different stitch pattern, so there's no chance of getting bored with the pattern. I love this way of trying new stitch patterns, too. Even if you're not crazy about one of them, it's soon over and you're on to the next one!

Check out the free pattern at left—the Mosaic Tile Afghan is just gorgeous! This would become a family heirloom for sure.

But back to the finishing issue, which is mostly made up of seaming the squares together. You can use good old mattress stitch, which is my favorite seaming technique for most things, but I'm partial to slip-stitch crochet seaming for seaming afghan squares.

Here's how you do it:

Slip-Stitch Crochet

    
Using the slip-stitch crochet seam

With right sides together and working one stitch at a time, insert a crochet hook through both thicknesses into the stitch just below the bound off edge, or one stitch in front of the selvedge edge.

Catch the yarn and draw a loop through both thicknesses, then catch the yarn again and draw this loop through the first. This secures the end stitches together.

*Insert the hook into the next stitch, through both thicknesses, then catch and draw a loop back through both thicknesses and through the loop on the crochet hook; repeat from *, keeping the crochet stitches even.

To end, cut the yarn leaving a tail 6–8" (15–20 cm) long. Pull the tail end through the last stitch on the hook. Thread the tail on a tapestry needle and weave it back through the seam allowance for 2" (5 cm).

TIP: Slip-stitch crocheted seams are easy to remove if you've made a mistake—just pull on the working yarn to ravel. Because it's so easily removed, it's ideal for adjusting the placement of matching seams or easing in fullness.

—Vicki Square, from The Knitter's Companion

I'm going to be using the slip-stitch technique in the next week or so because I've got a baby blanket to deliver. Just three more squares to knit!

Join me in knitting an afghan! I know you'll enjoy it as much as I do.

Cheers,

P.S. What's your favorite seaming technique? Share it with us in the comments!

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