Knitting for Charity: Baby Blankets

Knitted baby blankets are so special; they’re a fabulous, heart-felt gift that can become a family heirloom. So many people are in need this time of year, I thought I’d do a newsletter about knitting for charity, specifically, baby blankets.

Wave Border from Weldon’s
Practical Knitter Volume 10

And, Knitting Daily readers, I need your help writing with this! I know you’re all a treasure trove of information, so please leave a comment below and let us all know which charity is close to your heart, even if it’s not just for baby blankets.

One of my favorite charities is the Linus Project. It’s mission is to “provide love, a sense of security, warmth and comfort to children who are seriously ill, traumatized, or otherwise in need through the gifts of new, handmade blankets and afghans, lovingly created by volunteer ‘blanketeers.'” Who wouldn’t want to be part of that effort?

Many charities have patterns available, as does the Linus project. But this is Knitting Daily and I’m all about sharing patterns with you!

Here’s a border pattern from the eBook Weldon’s Practical Knitter Volume 10, originally published in the 1890s. The Wave Border is timeless, obviously, and it’s an easy knitting pattern that would adorn any handknitted blanket beautifully! I’ve written out the directions exactly as they appear in the eBook, but I’ve put each pattern row on its own line, making it much easier to read. It’s all run together in one paragraph in the eBook!

Wave Border

This border is useful for edging flannel petticoats, for which purpose it may be knitted with Princess Alexandra knitting yarn, and a pair of No. 14 steel needles; it also may be employed for bordering quilts and toilet-covers, or for any purpose for which a handsome wide border is desired.

Cast on 35 stitches. Knit one plain row.
1st Pattern row—Slip 1, knit 6, make 1 and knit 2 together thirteen times, make 1, knit 2.
2nd row—Plain.
3rd row—Slip 1, knit 7, make 1 and knit 2 together 13 times, make 1, knit 2.
4th row—Plain.
5th row—Slip 1, knit 8, make 1 and knit 2 together 13 times, make 1, knit 2.
6th row—Plain.
7th row—
Slip 1, knit 9, make 1 and knit 2 together thirteen times, make 1, knit 2.
8th row—Plain.
9th row—Slip 1, knit 10, make 1 and knit 2 together 13 times, make 1, knit 2.
10th row—Plain.
11th row—Plain, 40 stitches on.
12th row—Knit 1, knit 2 together, make 1 and knit 2 together 14 times, knit 9.
13th row—Plain.
14th row—Knit 1, knit 2 together, make 1 and knit 2 together 14 times, knit 8.
15th row—Plain.
16th row—Knit 1, knit 2 together, make 1 and knit 2 together 14 times, knit 7.
17th row—Plain.
18th row—Knit 1, knit 2 together, make 1 and knit 2 together 14 times, knit 6.
19th row—Plain.
20th row—Knit 1, knit 2 together, make 1 and knit 2 together fourteen times, knit 5.
21st row—Plain.
22nd row—Plain, 35 stitches on.
Repeat from the 1st row for the length required.

From Weldon’s Practical Knitter Volume 10

You could use this pattern to edge a simple dishcloth-type blanket (search the internet for Grandma’s Favorite Dishcloth, and just keep increasing the pattern until your blanket is the size you want it to be, then decrease back down to the three or four stitches you started with), or add it to your favorite afghan pattern.

What an easy way to beautify any knitted afghan or baby blanket! And if you use it to border a toilet-cover, as suggested above, please email me a photo!

As you can see, Weldon’s is full of interesting, unique patterns, along with a wonderful peek into the past. Download our newest offering, Weldon’s Practical Knitter Series 9-12 Set, today.

And don’t forget to leave a comment below, suggesting your favorite charity for afghan or baby blanket donations!

Cheers,

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