Jane Austen Knits, 2011

JaneAustinKnits2011Cover

On the Cover:
Theme Scarf by Stephenie Gaustad

 

 

DEPARTMENTS

Editor’s Page
Dry Goods
Glossary/Abbreviations
Advertisers’ Index
Project Index

 

 

 

 

 


Northanger Abbey Hood
by Catherine Salter Bayar

 

 


Lydia Military Spencer
by Annie Modesitt

 

 


Emma Shrug
by Tian Connaughton

FEATURES

KNITTING TO AUSTEN by Amy O’Neill Houck

THE MIGHTY MUSLIN by Susan Forgue

JANE’S WORLD IN HISTORY by Susan Forgue

SENSE AND SENSIBILITY PATTERN COMPANY by Joanna Johnson

JANE AND KNITTING by Sheryl Craig

REGENCY FASHION IN COLOR by Meghan Fernandes

WHAT WOULD JANE KNIT? by Larissa Brown

JANE AUSTEN, MULTITASKER by Rebecca Dickson

PROJECTS

  COUNTRY

Linen Work Apron by Annie Modesitt

Short Stays by Larissa Brown

Fitz Fingerless Mitts by Catherine Shields

Pemberley Slippers by Kristi Schueler

Lydia Bennet Secret Stockings by Susan Strawn

An Aran for Frederick by Kathleen Dames

Georgiana Shawlette by Susanna IC

Modern Reticule by Heather Zoppetti

Frivolous Socks by Katie Franceschi

 

  MANOR

Woodhouse Spencer by Jennifer Wood

Marianne Dashwood Stockings by Ann Kingstone

Lambton Top by Theressa Silver

Barton Cottage Shrug by Kristi Schueler

Elinor’s Tea Cozy by Anne Berk, Valerie Allen, Jill Betts, and Elaine Blatt

Flower and Lace Cuffs by Carol Huebscher Rhoades

Fiori Pullover by Mary Annarella

  GARDEN

Northanger Abbey Hood by Catherine Salter Bayar

Elinor Tunic by Kristi Schueler

Scarlet Capelet by Heather Zoppetti

Chawton Mittens by Anne Blayney

Lydia Military Spencer by Annie Modesitt

Mr. Knightley’s Vest by Jenny Sorensen

Frederick & Anne Scarf by Kirsti Johanson

Leafy Muff by Karen Holmes

Theme Scarf by Stephenie Gaustad

Variation Scarf by Stephenie Gaustad

 

  TOWN

Emma Shrug by Tian Connaughton

Josephine Shawl by Rebecca Blair

Meryton Coat by Stephanie Earp

Kensington Mitts by Annie Modesitt

Miss Morland’s Neckcloth by Kendra Nitta

Miss Bennet’s Beaded Bag by Joanna Johnson

Sense and Fashion Handwarmers by Hannah Poon

Diamond and Cross Reticule by Kendra Nitta

Evening Spencer by Corrina Ferguson

Picturesque Cape by Sharon Fuller

Jane Austen Knits 2011

Jane Austen Knits 2011

LITERATURE AND KNITTING seem to be a perfect pairing—especially when you consider the work of Jane Austen. Perhaps this is because knitting, like reading, has a meditative, quiet quality to it. Jane Austen’s novels resonate with knitters for the same reason that they have resonated with readers around the world for centuries—Jane Austen captures the essence of humanity: quietly, succinctly, and with rich humor.

Her stories are timeless. Through them we gain insight into a world (specifically the Regency era, 1795–1837, in England) that was governed by social class and strict rules of decorum. But at the same time, Jane Austen weaves narratives about people pursuing happiness despite obstacles, remaining true to themselves while still loyal to their family and friends, and struggling to know themselves—stories that transcend time, place, and situation.

For knitters, the films inspired by her books are the perfect companions as we snuggle into blankets on the couch with a cup of steaming tea as the snow piles up outside, adding stitches to the garments that hold our dreams and wishes. Immersed in the narratives, we are allowed to escape to a seemingly simpler time and imagine quiet moments to create and contemplate.

On a personal level, I can’t say that I always loved Jane Austen as well as I do now—my English teacher Ms. Winters probably doesn’t remember quite as clearly as I do that I burst into tears when I had to reveal in her tenth grade literature class that I had tried to read Pride and Prejudice in one night and couldn’t keep all the characters straight. Fortunately, I rediscovered Jane Austen’s work during college with the help of my sister, Julia (who shares a birthday with Jane), and the 1995 BBC production of Pride and Prejudice. After that, it was a slippery slope, and I fi nd that many of my furniture and clothing purchases (in addition to books) have been infl uenced by my love of Jane Austen. For instance, I bought an antique writing desk for my living room where I handwrite letters on occasion—it is also where my Jane Austen action fi gure (a birthday gift from my sister) resides. We used a number of my frocks as the undergarments for the photo shoot (however, in this I was outdone, as Joanna Johnson—who helped hugely with the yarn selection and photo shoot—had sewn Regency-era gowns so that she could attend a reenactment of a Regency ball).

Once this issue is put to bed, I’m looking forward to casting on for a spencer, or at least my very own reticule, and listening to Sense and Sensibility (a favorite for the portrayal of sisters) while I enjoy a cup of Earl Grey tea. Happy knitting,

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Amy Clarke Moore, editor
aclarkemoore@interweave.com