Beginning the Forest Petals Shawl: A Scarf Story

 

Prompted by your questions on the construction of the Forest Petals Shawl and my own fascination with the shawl's playful use of negative space, I pulled out a couple of skeins of yarn and a Tunisian hook and started chaining. Then I stopped and spent several minutes studying the pattern and layout diagram. Studying a pattern before you begin is quite possibly as important as the gauge swatch. True some parts of a pattern will not make complete sense until you have crocheted to that point, but a familiarity with the project construction can go a long way to at decreasing confusion later.

I will admit that I am not a great wearer of shawls but I love scarves. Seeing no reason I couldn't use this pattern to create a fabulous Spring scarf, I used the foundation chain to number of diamonds formula given in the notes to determine how many chains were needed for a three diamond width scarf.

 
 The first diamond progressed pretty quickly. If you have never worked Tunisian simple stitch before this video can illustrate the technique for you or help you visualize the stitches. Remember that for the first diamond you are not working in all of your foundation chains. The last stitch of the diamond is a slip stitch in the next unworked chain of the foundation chain.

 

The second diamond is begun by picking up loops in the next unused chains of your foundation chain. Now work the second diamond as for the first. You're getting the hang of it now. If you are working more than the 3 diamonds I am continue working across the chain.

After you have finished the last diamond, you should have worked into all of your original chains. Turn the diamond counterclockwise and slip stitch your way up the side. Though simple, this is one of the most important steps. I forgot it a time or two, and it will cause your end diamond to twist and not join correctly.

The row of diamonds you have just finished is referred to as a tier. My scarf has 20 tiers while the Forest Petals Shawl has 40 tiers. Remember a tier does not refer to the number of individual diamonds but to the number of rows of diamonds.

In my next blog we will look at creating subsequent tiers and joining them as we go. Have fun playing with this Tunisian Technique. I found it terribly addictive.

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